Open Side Menu Go to the Top
Register
MISC/RANDOM/BS Golf Chatter Thread MISC/RANDOM/BS Golf Chatter Thread

06-10-2024 , 09:38 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booker Wolfbox
Just for entertainment, here's a question for the thread:

You are noob golf course architect. You're going to be famous someday, but right now nobody knows you. You want to come up with a signature design element, something that stamps a course (subtly or not as you wish) as yours.

What are you choosing?

I'll answer with: Enormous teeing areas on par 3s. I hate par 3s with small teeing areas, the ground gets all beat up and looks terrible. Some places end up putting in mat tees. Awful. I want HUGE areas so that there is plenty of time for the turf to recover and the added benefit of being able to play the holes at different lengths and angles.
A course with no sand bunkers would be interesting.

In windy areas (e.g. LV) it makes a lot of sense because the sand blows away and the bunkers turn into concrete. Also many courses don't have the time/money/resources to manage bunkers well.

I'm sure naysayers would complain about the course looking too green, and removing an element of skill. But features such as high fescue can be added for contrast. And grass bunkers can easily be more difficult to escape from compared to sand bunkers.
MISC/RANDOM/BS Golf Chatter Thread Quote
06-10-2024 , 09:47 PM
substitute water hazards with waste areas filled with football-sized rocks that are considered unplayable hazards if your ball ultimately lands in one. less lost balls and none of the problems you get with water (mosquitos, alligators, water moccasins, water shortages, flooding, stench, etc.). some holes you could use slightly different colors of rock and it could look quite pretty.

ofc these could already be a thing but I can only think of one that I've ever seen.
MISC/RANDOM/BS Golf Chatter Thread Quote
06-10-2024 , 10:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by PokerHero77
A course with no sand bunkers would be interesting.

In windy areas (e.g. LV) it makes a lot of sense because the sand blows away and the bunkers turn into concrete. Also many courses don't have the time/money/resources to manage bunkers well.

I'm sure naysayers would complain about the course looking too green, and removing an element of skill. But features such as high fescue can be added for contrast. And grass bunkers can easily be more difficult to escape from compared to sand bunkers.
Sheep Ranch uses grass bunkers because of wind scouring the sand.
MISC/RANDOM/BS Golf Chatter Thread Quote

      
m