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Poker strategy AMA Poker strategy AMA

04-23-2013 , 04:59 PM
thank you very much for taking the time to answer my question!
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04-23-2013 , 05:04 PM
In what spots should we be overbetting as a bluff (50NL) vs decent regs? Obv vs bad players our overbet range is pure value.
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04-23-2013 , 08:08 PM
Sitting in blinds with KQ type hand, reg on button has wide stealing range and steals. A 3bet just gets him to fold his garbage, flatting seems better because we get him in more dominating situations, but now we have to play postflop out of position. Do have any standard or suggested postflop lines to take when we miss?
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04-23-2013 , 09:59 PM
I'll throw some out there:
- how do you determine who should have the betting lead?
- in what ways should we distinguish "made" hands from "drawing" hands?
- how do you weigh the options of capping your range vs allowing your opponent to see a cheap card on a drawy board?
- gto, how do you think combo hands such as a pair + draw should be played (slowly or strongly)... similarly, should the nut flush draw be in your raising range vs calling range?
- if a villain has an obviously exploitable leak such as folding too much to 3-bets, do you think that you should exploit that leak 100% of the time to maximize the EV in a vacuum, or do you think that you should be coy and exploit it less than 100% of the time so you don't tip him off.
- is pot control a relevant concept in todays games?

i'm not necessarily confused about all these topics but i thought i'd throw some stuff out there, since you kept asking in posts.
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04-24-2013 , 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Yoshimiii
Thanks a lot for taking the time to answer these, this helps so much.
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Originally Posted by abrblja
thank you very much for taking the time to answer my question!
You're welcome, thanks for contributing
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04-24-2013 , 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by TDA2
In what spots should we be overbetting as a bluff (50NL) vs decent regs? Obv vs bad players our overbet range is pure value.
I should first clarify that overbetting vs. bad players should not be pure value.

In fact, often the opposite. Poor players analyze the dollar amount of the hand, not rationalize information. You may have heard someone say after facing a bet "This hand isn't worth that amount of money". In essence, they aren't even thinking about the action that has taken place, rather just that their middle pair isn't worth $40. Try moving down to .10/.25 and shipping $20 into $10 pots (thoughtfully, in spots where your opponent's range is weak) and you'll be surprised at the amount of folds you get.

Against regs, you want to consider overbetting in a couple scenarios: where your perceived range is strong, and where their range is weak. This generally occurs on the river, where hand ranges are by definition most defined, but I don't think that people apply it often enough to the turns.

I began to incorporate donk betting into my game over a year before it actually became really popular. My increasingly bigger advantage was that I had played so many hands where I had donk bet the flop, I was much more comfortable and familiar with a hand playing out than my opponents. A similar scenario will happen with overbetting. If you are overbetting more consistently than your opponents, you will be more comfortable with it and your edge will grow larger.

At high stakes right now there is often overbetting. However, I think it is underutilized on the turn, and even can be used on the flop once in a while. Against, hands and situations where your perceived range is strong, and/or where your opponent's range is weak.
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04-24-2013 , 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by mtagliaf
Sitting in blinds with KQ type hand, reg on button has wide stealing range and steals. A 3bet just gets him to fold his garbage, flatting seems better because we get him in more dominating situations, but now we have to play postflop out of position. Do have any standard or suggested postflop lines to take when we miss?
With KQ-type hands, sometimes flat, sometimes 3bet. Players will be looking to find out what you do with these equal types of hands, and showing that you mix up your play is critical because it makes you much more difficult to play against.

Postflop I would take all the lines -- check/call, check/fold, check/raise, and lead out. However, I would probably be aggressively check/raising as a default because I would expect an NL50 reg to fire out on a lot of flops and just give up when facing a check/raise because they are playing on 10 tables and they don't have time to give full consideration to the hand.

I think the better question to ask is how to decide when to continue, especially when you miss. If you run a simulation of KQ vs top 40% of hands, we are about 45% equity or more on half of flops. I would say that half of the flops we will hit some kind of draw or hand. However, through 80% of flops we still have over 38% equity, which means 30% of flops we seemingly don't have anything but we theoretically shouldn't be folding.

I would basically start going through flops where we have nothing (overcards to the board, maybe only continue when you have a BDFD or BDSD) with the confidence that we're not actually in bad shape.
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04-24-2013 , 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by EmptyPromises
I'll throw some out there:
- how do you determine who should have the betting lead?
It's primarily determined by who raised last (eg the preflop raiser). However, you are able to take the lead whenever the action is on you and no one has bet yet.
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- in what ways should we distinguish "made" hands from "drawing" hands?
If someone is playing in an exploitative manner, we might be able to get away with playing each of our types of hands differently. However, I think a lot of people forget that, from an equity perspective, draws are our second strongest tier of hands and they should be played more aggressively than many give credit for.
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- how do you weigh the options of capping your range vs allowing your opponent to see a cheap card on a drawy board?
I'm not quite understanding how those are opposite topics. Are you saying that betting will cap your range? In what sense? I am more likely to say a player's range is capped after he checks (on a Q83ss5 board in a single raised pot BTN/BB, if I check and an opponent checks behind, I'm going to say, completely discredit them having a good queen+)
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- gto, how do you think combo hands such as a pair + draw should be played (slowly or strongly)... similarly, should the nut flush draw be in your raising range vs calling range?
How to play those hands isn't really related to GTO. GTO is a state of play that is highly inefficient in reality. We rarely want to play in an unexploitable manner because our opponent has flaws that we need to exploit. If you never fold, I will never bluff you. Is it wrong to never bluff in poker? From a game theory perspective, yes. But, I am playing exploitably (never bluffing) to exploit your weakness (never folding).

The specific answers to your questions are to mix up what you do with both of those hands; however, at the lower limits people are just not aggressive enough with their draws so I would keep that in mind and really try to play them aggressively.

The thing about a line is you never know where it is until you cross it. When's the last time you've (not you specifically) check/raised the flop and bombed the turn and river with a draw? Remember, a bet is profitable if it gets a fold greater than a certain % of the time. On the river, if I pot it as a bluff and you call it 45% of the time, I'm making money despite losing 45% of the time.

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- if a villain has an obviously exploitable leak such as folding too much to 3-bets, do you think that you should exploit that leak 100% of the time to maximize the EV in a vacuum, or do you think that you should be coy and exploit it less than 100% of the time so you don't tip him off.
You answered this question yourself . It's the latter. We never want our adjustments to force our opponents to correct their major flaws.
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- is pot control a relevant concept in todays games?
Of course. If I have an inherently weak range in a given scenario, I don't want to bloat the pot. Also keep in mind that checking goes beyond pot control. Maybe you don't need to exercise pot control in a certain hand, but checking could induce a bluff instead.
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i'm not necessarily confused about all these topics but i thought i'd throw some stuff out there, since you kept asking in posts.
No worries, thanks for the questions!
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04-24-2013 , 08:15 AM
Thank you for doing this. Some really nice info so far. My question is: Biggest difference between 2bb winner and 8bb winner?
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04-24-2013 , 09:50 AM
[QUOTE=MYNAMEIZGREG;38192184]



Here's something that I've never heard others mention and I've never understood why.

BTN opens with KQ, we 3bet KT in the BB, he calls.

Oh crap. Right? Not exactly.

The fact that we share cards is bad when we hit top pair. Oh, you mean the last two kings in the deck? AKA 12% of the time? The other 88% of the time, we've increased the chance of our opponent having nothing. QUOTE]

^^ This, among many other things you've written, is just awesome. That is such a simple thing but makes so much sense.

If it's okay I'll ask a couple general questions about two areas that I'm struggling with in 6max NL10 and NL16.

*Small pairs. Wrote a long question but it didn't make sense so I deleted it; could you possible give some pointers about when to fold/call with small pairs in and out of position preflop? Not talking about ALL possibilities like 3betting/4betting with small pairs but just like how to call optimally preflop, when thinking both about setmining odds and possibly outplaying our oopponent postflop. Sorry I know it's too general but I struggle with this.

*Firing the second barrel on turn. This is IMO perhaps one of the most important aspects of today's SSNL game, since people are floating a bunch in position to try to take it away later, and also the biggest reason why people's redlines are so bad all the time.

My Q: Could you give some examples of what to think about (looking at the board as a whole but also at how it changes through the turn card) when firing a second barrel:
- What are some good boards to 2barrel?
- " " bad boards to 2barrel.

This question is in regard to how the opponent will perceive my second barrel, not in regard to what my holdings are.
Ex: I raise XX from EP and Button flats. Flop 337r I cbet, he floats. Turn 337 A, I bet and he folds. That's obv a good board as the ace hits my range and is a perfect bluff card. Other examples/general idaes/things to think about when deciding whether or not to fire the second barrel?

TY
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04-24-2013 , 10:40 AM
How can I fix a quite large gap between my flop cbet% and my turn cbet%? Or where do I need to look to improve it?
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04-24-2013 , 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by MYNAMEIZGREG
It's primarily determined by who raised last (eg the preflop raiser). However, you are able to take the lead whenever the action is on you and no one has bet yet.
What characteristic of the player who raised last (ie preflop raiser) makes her the more likely candidate?


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If someone is playing in an exploitative manner, we might be able to get away with playing each of our types of hands differently. However, I think a lot of people forget that, from an equity perspective, draws are our second strongest tier of hands and they should be played more aggressively than many give credit for.
I think your right that they're quite a strong hand, but I actually don't think that this is true from an equity perspective. For example, if the CO raised pre flop and we called on the button, and on the flop the CO leads into us, I'd assume that our weak pairs have more equity than most of our drawing hands against his betting range, but I'd also think that our drawing hands are higher EV defends.

Why do you think raising our draws here might work better than calling? (make up your own assumptions).


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I'm not quite understanding how those are opposite topics. Are you saying that betting will cap your range? In what sense? I am more likely to say a player's range is capped after he checks (on a Q83ss5 board in a single raised pot BTN/BB, if I check and an opponent checks behind, I'm going to say, completely discredit them having a good queen+)
Sorry, let's use the same scenario above. CO raised we called in the BU, flop comes K J 9. Villain bets and we have a hand like KJ here. The Villain bets. Hero raises or calls? An argument could be made for raising since the Villain likely has a pretty depolarized betting range and the board is drawy, so you want to charge him to see the turn and get him to possibly fold some of his weaker gut shots that bet or pairs which could his a better two pair on the turn. However, if we raise KJ here (which I'm assuming is our only two pair hand), than our range might be capped at KQ (assumign we 3-bet AK preflop). This means that on the turn when the Villain has KQ, he'll have the nuts on all blank type turns. When our range is capped at just KQ, the Villain can make lots of overbets with absolutely weak hands.
I can see an argument for both raising and flatting, and I was wondering if you have any thoughts on the matter?

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The specific answers to your questions are to mix up what you do with both of those hands; however, at the lower limits people are just not aggressive enough with their draws so I would keep that in mind and really try to play them aggressively.

The thing about a line is you never know where it is until you cross it. When's the last time you've (not you specifically) check/raised the flop and bombed the turn and river with a draw? Remember, a bet is profitable if it gets a fold greater than a certain % of the time. On the river, if I pot it as a bluff and you call it 45% of the time, I'm making money despite losing 45% of the time.
Why do you think the specific answer is to mix up what you do with both hands?

Similar to the above scenario, don't you think that our calling range needs to have some drawing hands in it so we can be nutted on some future streets (especially if the stacks are deep enough?).

What is it from lower stakes that makes you think that people don't play draws aggressively... is it when they could bet or when facing a bet?


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You answered this question yourself . It's the latter. We never want our adjustments to force our opponents to correct their major flaws.
Do you think that most opponents will adjust correctly though?


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No worries, thanks for the questions!
Thanks for taking the time to answer questions. Are you thinking of getting involved in poker again? Are you affiliated with any training sites today?
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04-24-2013 , 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by MYNAMEIZGREG
BTN opens with KQ, we 3bet KT in the BB, he calls.

Oh crap. Right? Not exactly.

The fact that we share cards is bad when we hit top pair. Oh, you mean the last two kings in the deck? AKA 12% of the time? The other 88% of the time, we've increased the chance of our opponent having nothing.
It's a wash - he's increasing the chance that we have nothing, also. We have blockers for each other. The blocker effect is one way we can choose bluff hands to 3bet (like A-small) - not only does he have a big hand less of the time, but when he does have one and continues, he will hit less of the time also.

For me it's more about continuance ranges. I'm sitting there with KQ in the blind and BTN steals. I know he probably folds everything worse and continues with everything better if I three bet. It's still +EV to 3bet because he gives up his 30%-40% equity share when he folds. There's also a bluff component because he will often fold better (small pairs, Ax, etc).

So do I just take that +EV situation and call it a day, or can I earn more in the long run by trying to set up a situation postflop where I know I'm ahead of his overall range, and most of the time dominating when we share cards?
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04-24-2013 , 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Winwinwin
Thank you for doing this. Some really nice info so far. My question is: Biggest difference between 2bb winner and 8bb winner?
Thanks for the compliment!

I have no ****ing idea . There's no secret sauce. Make your opponent make mistakes, minimize the mistakes you make.
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04-24-2013 , 04:17 PM
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Originally Posted by StickAround
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Originally Posted by MYNAMEIZGREG



Here's something that I've never heard others mention and I've never understood why.

BTN opens with KQ, we 3bet KT in the BB, he calls.

Oh crap. Right? Not exactly.

The fact that we share cards is bad when we hit top pair. Oh, you mean the last two kings in the deck? AKA 12% of the time? The other 88% of the time, we've increased the chance of our opponent having nothing.
^^ This, among many other things you've written, is just awesome. That is such a simple thing but makes so much sense.
Awesome, thanks for the compliments and also the questions.
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If it's okay I'll ask a couple general questions about two areas that I'm struggling with in 6max NL10 and NL16.

*Small pairs. Wrote a long question but it didn't make sense so I deleted it; could you possible give some pointers about when to fold/call with small pairs in and out of position preflop? Not talking about ALL possibilities like 3betting/4betting with small pairs but just like how to call optimally preflop, when thinking both about setmining odds and possibly outplaying our oopponent postflop. Sorry I know it's too general but I struggle with this.
The only thing you should be sorry for is the fact that you're apologizing in a thread where AMA stands for ask me anything .

I think part of one of my previous answers will be beneficial (PPs in this refers to 22-66):

There are a ton of situations like this in poker. Most of them wind up ranging from: secretly leaking a ton of money, to squeezing out an extra bit of profit.

Because this is the case, my default against a lot of players is to just fold the PPs. If I do not know specifically what I am going to do postflop to extract extra money, it's going to be pretty tough to. Add in the myriad of unknown variables behind me, and it's not really a great situation to put yourself in.

OOP it's very similar: folding a decent amount of the time I don't really have a plan, but definitely flatting in multiway pots.

I think people overestimate their ability to stack an opponent when they flop a set. In order to stack someone with confidence, they must not really be able to fold postflop (eg your implied odds). Calling with the idea of trying to hit a set to stack someone, but taking it away when you miss is an oxymoron.

We generally think of flatting when someone's range is tight. But, in addition to being tight, they must not be able to fold their tight range postflop.

One more note, if we are flatting preflop with the intention of taking it away often postflop, sPP are some of the worst hands to do that with. We either rip the flop and hit a set or we have a very bad/vulnerable hand. We'd be much better off with a suited gapper where we could make a semi-bluff that has a lot more equity vs. a range.

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*Firing the second barrel on turn. This is IMO perhaps one of the most important aspects of today's SSNL game, since people are floating a bunch in position to try to take it away later, and also the biggest reason why people's redlines are so bad all the time.

My Q: Could you give some examples of what to think about (looking at the board as a whole but also at how it changes through the turn card) when firing a second barrel:
- What are some good boards to 2barrel?
- " " bad boards to 2barrel.
Some of the worst boards to double barrel with complete air are ones with connected cards (or draw heavy in general). There are lots of pairs + gutshots, or OESDs out there and you won't get them to fold (on the turn ). However, this is mitigated by the fact that we often have that type of a hand, so we aren't making a full on bluff, rather a semi-bluff. Which is acceptable in my mind.

In actuality, it's based off our perceived range preflop. If we open on the button, there really isn't a board we can't double barrel a ton of the time. If we open under the gun, we can still double barrel most boards, but we have to fire less often on a 458ss because those hands make up less of our perceived range.

We want to double barrel more often when our opponent's perceived range is hurt by the turn card.

I advocate double barreling a lot. Just be aware that this means we'll need to start being comfortable triple barreling. We'll get less folds less %s on the turn (although we'll make more money because of the frequency), so we have to make up for that on rivers.


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This question is in regard to how the opponent will perceive my second barrel, not in regard to what my holdings are.
Ex: I raise XX from EP and Button flats. Flop 337r I cbet, he floats. Turn 337 A, I bet and he folds. That's obv a good board as the ace hits my range and is a perfect bluff card. Other examples/general idaes/things to think about when deciding whether or not to fire the second barrel?

TY
I think I answered this above, let me know if you think otherwise.
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04-24-2013 , 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by blindninja
How can I fix a quite large gap between my flop cbet% and my turn cbet%? Or where do I need to look to improve it?
Check out http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/sh...6&postcount=65 and let me know if you're looking for more information.
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04-24-2013 , 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by MYNAMEIZGREG
Check out http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/sh...6&postcount=65 and let me know if you're looking for more information.
First let me say thanks for helping all us µNL players out and for the quick response you gave.

That post did indeed help, but it also raised some more questions such as: When should I tripple barrel?

Here are my cbetting stats, flop cbet% too high I guess and the gap between flop & turn aswell, I play 6max btw:

Flop Cbet%: 70,3
Flop Cbet% Success: 42,3

Turn Cbet%: 44,2
Turn Cbet% Success: 35,6

River Cbet%: 53,6%
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04-24-2013 , 06:04 PM
Some great info here Greg, thanks.

You mentioned donkbetting in an earlier post. What situations would you recommend doing it in and why in general, and more specifically in a HU pot vs a reg?
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04-24-2013 , 09:42 PM
In HU play, I've struggled with floaters. Mainly guys with f2cb rates in the 35-50 range.

In position, what should I be analyzing to better tune my 2-barrel range. More importantly, OOP (which means 3b pots), how often is too often to cb vs say a 65ft3b/40f2cb; and how do I find the profitable 2-barrel spots.

In position, we're still talking about a lot of pot ranging in the 10-12bb range ott. OOP, though, with more equity (TPGK and combos), more turn c/rs are something I've employed over a small sample, but this gets really expensive, and not sure if this is exploitative or spew.
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04-24-2013 , 11:25 PM
Hi Greg,

What do you think about minraising the button when HU? How would you counter players who do this?
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04-25-2013 , 08:32 AM
what from your point of view are the biggest leaks micro/smallstakes players have in the blinds? I know this kinda question came up already and and maybe it has been asked multiple times in this forum but i would like to hear some more on this.
for example my wtsd in the sb seems quite high, compared to other positions. Is that normal? i have a lossrate of 40bb/100 from BB and a lossrate of almost 26bb/100 in the SB.
a) how do i set filters which actually help me finding leaks in my blindplay?
b) are there any awesome videos, strat threads etc you would recommend?
c) at which lossrate does it start to get bad in the blinds aswell as in non-sd winnings in general for 6max and fr?

thanks alot for doing this!
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04-25-2013 , 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by mtagliaf
It's a wash - he's increasing the chance that we have nothing, also. We have blockers for each other. The blocker effect is one way we can choose bluff hands to 3bet (like A-small) - not only does he have a big hand less of the time, but when he does have one and continues, he will hit less of the time also.
I disagree. When I 3bet, if both of us flop nothing, I'm going to win more often than the other player. Even if I'm out of position. It's a matter of initiative. If I do not believe that to be the case, then there isn't really a compelling reason (outside of occasional balance) to put yourself in what you determine to be an unprofitable situation.

Fun history sidenote: To the best of my knowledge, 3betting Ax as a bluff was made famous by SEABEAST, during MTTs. The reason why he, and others in tournaments, can 3bet Ax as a bluff is because stacks are shallow and there generally isn't room for postflop play (if there is, I would argue it is bad to 3bet that hand), meaning bluffing with two napkins is okay if the guy is gonna fold or shove. In other words, when we are behind with Ax, the AQ/AK/AJ type hands ship it, essentially letting us off the hook.

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For me it's more about continuance ranges. I'm sitting there with KQ in the blind and BTN steals. I know he probably folds everything worse and continues with everything better if I three bet. It's still +EV to 3bet because he gives up his 30%-40% equity share when he folds. There's also a bluff component because he will often fold better (small pairs, Ax, etc).

So do I just take that +EV situation and call it a day, or can I earn more in the long run by trying to set up a situation postflop where I know I'm ahead of his overall range, and most of the time dominating when we share cards?
The simple, yet frustrating, yet true answer is to do both.

Everything in poker is a spectrum. It's a sliding scale. If we were going to play one hand we'd do something, 100 hands we have to vary our play.

Side note: if your opponent is folding KJo in that position, then that is a major mistake (or the 3bettor is not 3betting frequently enough).

The reason why you have to make sure to vary your play with a hand like KQ is because your opponent is going to be specifically looking for what you do with those types of hands, because that is what everyone pays attention to. AJ/KQ/JQ/88 types. Fundamentally, we'd like those types of hands to be primarily in our calling range. However, we'd also like to protect our 3betting range (since there are only so many good starting hands in hold'em) so we need to incorporate them in there. If you want the theoretical correct answer: 3bet with them the minimum amount of the time for your opponent to think they are consistently in your 3betting range. Does that mean 25% of the time we should 3bet? No, I'd say that the last 10-30+ minutes of time at the tables are more relevant to consider. We may just have a great image and be able to 3bet confidently based off fold equity. Or, we may think it's a much better time to not inflate the pot.

You should definitely adjust your 3betting range based off what your opponent's calling range is, but make sure to also keep your frequency in mind because the most profitable play in a 3bet pot is just getting the guy to fold preflop.

That was a bit rambly so please let me know if something was unclear or your question wasn't answered.
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04-25-2013 , 09:30 AM
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Originally Posted by blindninja
First let me say thanks for helping all us µNL players out and for the quick response you gave.

That post did indeed help, but it also raised some more questions such as: When should I tripple barrel?

Here are my cbetting stats, flop cbet% too high I guess and the gap between flop & turn aswell, I play 6max btw:

Flop Cbet%: 70,3
Flop Cbet% Success: 42,3

Turn Cbet%: 44,2
Turn Cbet% Success: 35,6

River Cbet%: 53,6%
You're welcome!

I don't know/think your flop cbet % is too high; however, the majority of the time you see a flop you are seeing a turn (30-40% of the time it's you cbetting and getting called, 20-30% of the time you are checking back).

So ~60% of the time when you see a flop you see a turn. Which actually means that the turn will be incredibly important in your pots: what's the most likely thing to happen when you see a flop? That you will see a turn!

So your turn cbet % should be up there as well. Your turn success rate does not surprise me at all because it's uNL and your opponents are still peeling light on turns. Which really means that you need to be very aggressively firing rivers.

The thing about fish is, they are fish no matter what stakes they play. I'd say one of the strongest elements of my game is the ability to hyper-adjust my strategy against weaker players. It's not coincidental that I think game theory is primarily useful only as a point of reference. However, the other thing is that the fish you encounter at uNL are the same fish I would play at high stakes.

I'm going to challenge you and simply answer your river firing question: start firing on all kinds of rivers. There are a ton of players who will call/call/fold and one of the bigger differences I've seen in lower stakes players and higher stakes players is being able to recognize this fact and fire three almost as a default.

There's a natural progression that takes place in poker. Let's pretend I never bet any street. When I start betting the flop, you'll start peeling flop and folding turn. When I start betting the turn now, you'll eventually also peel the turn, but now you fold the river. When I've shown a propensity to fire the river also, now you'll start calling down all three streets. At which point I should very aggressively value bet. At which point you start folding a little more often, at which point I start bluffing a little more often. And on and on.

The key in this scenario is that my frequencies aren't changing dramatically. However, I am increasing my value range. Stuff like QQ on 78K4T. And now we can take advantage of all those perceived missed draws that have crept into our perceived range due to the fact that we are barreling often by value betting a wider range.

The biggest psychological barrier I think to increasing value betting ranges is getting called by an obvious hand (eg. KJ in our prior example) and thinking that your bet was dumb. Just drill it into your mind that, when called, if you win more than 50% of the time, it's a profitable bet.

The big bonus that you guys won't catch yet is that we are inherently beginning to balance ourselves is some of the most frequently occurring situations in hold'em (single raised pots), all the while doing it on an opponent-specific scale.

Let's say a board is 78K4T. If I bet (theoretically) any king for value or better, and a proportionate amount of missed draws, then you get to call me with any piece of the board when you think I'm bluffing. However, if I include 9T+, now I can add in more missed draws (or just random triple barrels) and my range is still balanced. However, two big things have changed: 1) you can't just bluffcatch as freely as before (which is HUGE because remember we only make hands so often in hold'em); and 2) you're facing a bet much more frequently. #2 is incredibly important and it's the backbone that allows us to play aggressively but not recklessly.
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04-25-2013 , 09:46 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by TWhelan
Some great info here Greg, thanks.

You mentioned donkbetting in an earlier post. What situations would you recommend doing it in and why in general, and more specifically in a HU pot vs a reg?
The default approach to donk betting is based off your opponent's cbetting frequency. The more frequently your opponent cbets, the less frequently you should donk bet. Because, they will have air/weak hand more often by default, and also you get their dead cbet money in the pot.

Then there are the next tier of things to consider: how comfortable are you with donk betting in general? What is your guess as to how your opponent will respond? When that person continues, will it often be a raise or a call? If it's going to be a raise, then there's a different set of hands you might want want to donk the flop with (eg draws capable of 3betting the flop, good value hands that can either 3bet the flop or call down (esp useful on draw-heavy boards), complete air that you just fold to a raise). Compared to facing calls where we might now want to have less air in our range unless we anticipate getting folds on the turn often. Are you unsure of how your opponent will react? Well, there's only one way to find out!

I have something else to say but I'm actually putting it in a post below because I think everyone should see it.
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04-25-2013 , 09:49 AM
For everyone:

I think one of the mental hurdles lower stakes players struggle with is the fear of a negative result. Players scare themselves into doing something or not doing something else due to results bias. Which is ironic because no one thinks getting it in with AA vs JJ is a bad idea, despite the fact that they'll lose 20% of the time. Rephrased: negative results will ALWAYS happen in poker even if you ALWAYS make correct decisions. So don't fear them.


It's not a coincidence that it often takes multiple attempts to move up, or that we suck when we start something new and then get better with experience. Poker is no different.

I've poured an insane amount of hours into the game in a thoughtful way (meaning not playing on auto-pilot). The reason I can sit here and say ask me any strategy question about poker and I'll answer it is only because I've been through it all. I didn't have a great understanding of how donk bets worked, or what specifically to 4bet; none of that stuff comes naturally (at least to me).

You just have to get out there, know you're gonna get punched in the face a lot, but at the end of it all you'll have a strategy that works for you. It's why a lot of my advice sounds like: start off doing everything (3betting that hand and flatting it and donking sometimes and check/calling sometimes and check/raising sometimes). It's sort of the truth to poker. I need to figure out your game and your weaknesses as quickly as possible so I can start exploiting them. While I'm figuring it out, I should be relatively balanced in my own strategy to protect you from doing the same thing against me.
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