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Old 06-20-2008, 08:52 PM   #1
Pokey
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Post Introduction to Table Selection

So everybody knows that table selection is one of the most important secrets to poker success. We've heard all the stories:

- So-and-so isn't very good at the mechanics of the game but he's a consistent winner because he's got fantastic table selection.

- Whats-his-name burned out like a shooting star not because he didn't have the chops but because he never recognized when he was outclassed at the table. He could easily hold his own against the average players at his level, but he consistently went after the best, and he got busted for it.

- If you're the tenth-best player in the world and you're sitting at a table with players #1 through #9, you should leave, because sitting there is -EV for you.

And so forth.

So table selection is super, super, super important. We hear it so often that it has become a part of our "poker mantra." Since we realize that if we improve our table selection our winrate will go up, we've gotten to the point where we actually consider table selection a skill for a good 2+2er, just like selective aggression or proper value betting.

But how the hell do we actually *do* it?

The nice thing about table selection is that the basics are so darned EASY. Once you know what you're looking for it becomes second-nature to be able to spot a "good" table versus a "bad" table. Everybody will have their own version of what a "good" table means, but the most basic guideline is this:

Good table selection means filling the seats with players that are most easily exploited by your style of play.

Did you notice that I didn't say anything about who those players are? That's because "easily exploited" is in the eye of the beholder. Much of poker has a rock-paper-scissors feel to it; at the risk of overly abusing the metaphor, a table full of "scissors" would be the perfect table for a "rock" but a HORRIBLE table for a "paper," whereas a table full of "rocks" would be fantastic for a "paper" but neutral EV for another rock, etc. Let's get started by trying to figure out who we can exploit.

Who the hell are you?

What is your playing style? Depending on how you play, there will be natural fits in the poker world: players you devour and players you fear. Let's explore the most common types of 2+2 uNL players:

1. I am weak-tight.

The most common type of uNLer is the weak-tight player. I don't mean that as an insult; it's actually a very effective winning strategy at uNL, which is why it is so common to see. The weak-tight player looks something like this:

- Tight preflop. Your VPIP is probably under 25%. You don't like to play unless you're actually holding a hand. You like to know that, before the cards even hit the board, you're winning.

- Aggressive preflop. Your PFR is probably half of your VPIP or more. If a hand is worth playing, you feel that it's worth fighting for. First in you damned near NEVER limp, unless circumstances are truly unusual.

- You don't often get to a showdown. It's not too common that you actually reach a showdown; for that to happen you'd have to have a great hand and your opponent would also have to have a great hand. Your fear of monsters under the bed means that you fold very often postflop; also, your aggression when you have a good hand means that your opponents usually fold when YOU have a good hand postflop. As a result, showdowns just don't come by very often.

How should a weak-tight player go about maximizing value through table selection? Well, you want opponents that you can easily exploit. You win the most by having the best hand and getting paid by weaker hands. You also don't deal well with aggression, so you'd like to mitigate that factor. Where does this leave you?

- You want your opponents to be loose. An opponent with a high VPIP will mix it up with you when he's behind, and that's where your winrate comes from. Loose is your friend: high VPIP (over 50%) and high WtSD (over 30%) are qualities you'd like to see in your opponents. This is especially true of the person directly on your right, since that's the person who will be paying you the most.

- You want your opponents to have stack sizes you are comfortable with. Ideally, you'd like to have your opponents with big enough stacks to make it worth your playing but not so large that you can get easily scared off the best hand. Where your comfort zone lies will be a personal decision.

- You want your opponents to be passive. You don't deal well with aggression, so you'd like to have someone who would not pressure you when you've got a big draw. This is especially true of the person directly on your left, since that's the person who could put the most pressure on you the most often. Look for average aggression numbers under 1.5; under 1.0 would be even better.
Note that the absolute most standard and generic advice about table selection is "loose and passive": that's because weak-tight players are the ones most often looking for input about how to table select. But what if you're NOT weak-tight?

2. I am a nit.

Nits are players who take the "tight" aspect of "tight/aggressive" VERY seriously but downplay the "aggressive" part a bit. Nits generally look something like this:

- Ridiculously tight preflop. A nit's VPIP will often be under 20% at a six-max table. Some nits actually have VPIPs below 15%. Basically, they just refuse to mix it up at ALL preflop, and as a result they don't play many hands.

- More aggressive preflop than postflop. A typical nit will raise most of the hands that they play preflop, but will often shut down postflop, usually after making a c-bet. Some nits have aggressive stats simply because they fold an insane amount of the time (the true "set hunters") while others actually look a bit on the passive side postflop because they go for pot control in all but the most obviously dominant situations.

- You hardly ever get to showdown, and you hardly ever LOSE at showdown. A nit doesn't see showdowns without a virtual lock on the hand, so WtSD will be remarkably low while W$SD will be equally remarkably high. It's not unheard-of for a nit to go to showdown under 20% of the time and win at showdown over 60% of the time.

How should a nit table select?

- You want your opponents to be aggressive. The most important aspect for a nit is to have aggressive opponents. Since the nit won't make plays on his own, his best bet for cashing in will be to slowplay and let his opponents bet themselves to death. Many is the TAG or LAG who fires off three barrels at a nit expecting a fold, only to find that his opponent has the stone cold nuts and has just milked him for an entire stack. The saddest sight in the world is a nit with flopped quads winning 8 BBs from a calling station with a flopped full house, but it happens depressingly often. Given that you're going to need your opponents to do all the work, find opponents WILLING to do the work. If your opponent has an average aggression rating over 2.5, you are happy. If it's over 4.0, you're ecstatic.

- You want your opponents to be loose post-flop. A high WtSD (say, over 30%) is a handy thing to look for in an opponent, because you want to make sure that on those rare occasions when you've actually GOT the hand you want, you're not going to lose your customers. A nit does not make his money through folding equity; he makes his money at showdowns. You'd like your showdowns to be frequent and you'd like your showdown pots to be enormous.

Nits are the only opponents who actually can make really good money from bad TAGs. Smart LAGs are terrified of good nits, but dumb LAGs have zero respect for nits (though they pay them off like freakin' slot machines). Watch for aggressive tables with extremely large pots: these will be your bread and butter.

3. I am a LAG.

LAGs never met a hand they didn't like, but they play all of their hands to the bone. A good LAG has the aggression of a TAG, the looseness of a donkey, and the selectiveness of a champion. The differences between a good LAG and a bad LAG are timing, hand reading, and table awareness, and those features mean the difference between being a huge winner and a huge loser. A LAG benefits greatly from smart table selection. What should a good LAG want in opponents?

- You want your opponents to be weak. Nits are absolute money buffets for a good LAG: the LAG wins most of the blinds, almost all of the small pots, many of the medium sized pots, and almost half of the big pots. By having weak opponents who fold entirely too often, the good LAG can steal relentlessly. While he loses more than his share of big pots, he steals so many of the (much more frequent) small- to medium-sized pots that it more than makes up for it. The good LAG understands Sal Bandini's advice: "apply pressure until you hear cartilidge snap or they crap in their pants." The best way to spot a weak opponent is to look at their W$WSF (smaller is better -- under 40% would be fantastic) and their WtSD (you don't want them going to showdown often -- under 25% is healthy for you).

- You want your opponents to be straightforward. Tricky opponents will be the death of a good LAG. Slowplaying is the most deadly weapon of the good LAG's opponents, so you want to watch for opponents who play in very obvious ways. Good ways to spot this are to look for small check-raise numbers (say, under 0.5%), small raise c-bet numbers (under 15% or so), and large fold to c-bet numbers (over 60% would be nice). When your opponent has a hand you'd like him to make it clear IMMEDIATELY; when he does not have a hand, you'd like him to fold IMMEDIATELY.

Good LAGs therefore prey on the bad regulars more than the bad tourists. Luckily, there are many bad regulars at the uNL (and SSNL, and MSNL) levels, so table selection is still a viable option.

----------

I only give advice for these three types of players because almost all other winning uNL players are going to be some mixture of these three, and the advice will therefore be some mixture of the advice above. Note that I didn't mention the loose-passive player: that's because it's not a winning strategy, and your best table selection is to look for the title "play money." If you are a calling station you should learn to play the game and THEN come back and think about maximizing your value through good table selection.

This advice is by no means the "end-all, be-all" of table selection, but hopefully it will at least get you started a bit more than the generic "look for bad players" that we hear too often, or the only slightly better "loose and passive." Table selection all boils down to (a) knowing the strengths of your playing style and (b) looking for targets who will most likely fall prey to your strengths without taking equivalent advantage of your weaknesses.

Last edited by Pokey; 06-20-2008 at 09:20 PM.
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Old 06-20-2008, 08:54 PM   #2
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

1st in a pokey thread!!!@##@$!!!!!
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Old 06-20-2008, 08:57 PM   #3
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

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1st in a pokey thread!!!@##@$!!!!!
waeklgj;awlgk;waejfklaw bastard
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Old 06-20-2008, 09:02 PM   #4
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

3rd, i'm happy w/ that.
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Old 06-20-2008, 09:06 PM   #5
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Great post!

I would also add that seat selection is really important as well.
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Old 06-20-2008, 09:08 PM   #6
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

nice post. I usually just look for the loose passive fishy types and leave it at it at that
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Old 06-20-2008, 09:11 PM   #7
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

this explains why I'm better at higher limits when I play good. and I play really bad sometimes....

I'm a lag
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Old 06-20-2008, 09:17 PM   #8
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Another instant classic!

Thanks for taking the time to help us improve our game.
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Old 06-20-2008, 09:27 PM   #9
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

For uNL.. as an normal 3-4tabling mofo playing 50NL or lower; table selection doesn't matter.

If you're ever considering to move up as a shark, you should know or at least have a rough idea of how to play all poker playing stiles. Rock, Nit, TAG, LAG and readjust to the game.
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Old 06-20-2008, 09:28 PM   #10
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Quote:
Originally Posted by checkmate36 View Post
Another instant classic!

Thanks for taking the time to help us improve our game.
+1, thanks a lot Pokey, your wisdom sure does help immensely.
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Old 06-20-2008, 09:50 PM   #11
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Great post Pokey.
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Old 06-20-2008, 10:16 PM   #12
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

[QUOTE=DeepCraft;4738585]
For uNL.. as an normal 3-4tabling mofo playing 50NL or lower; table selection doesn't matter.
QUOTE]

just bs
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Old 06-21-2008, 03:56 AM   #13
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeepCraft View Post
For uNL.. as an normal 3-4tabling mofo playing 50NL or lower; table selection doesn't matter.

If you're ever considering to move up as a shark, you should know or at least have a rough idea of how to play all poker playing stiles. Rock, Nit, TAG, LAG and readjust to the game.
It may seem that way in retrospect if you're good enough to crush those stakes, but as a starting player I'd rather play with the worst players at my stake than the best, even if the overall quality of play is low. I'd also argue that table selection matters more as a normal 3-4 tabler because the impact of the worst players at your tables will be more pronounced overall.
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Old 06-21-2008, 06:26 AM   #14
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Great job as always Pokey.
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Old 06-21-2008, 06:28 PM   #15
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Spurious said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spurious
I would also add that seat selection is really important as well.
Undeniably, but a separate issue. Once you've found a good TABLE, the next step is figuring out where at that table you'd like to sit. I didn't discuss seat selection because it's much harder to do in online poker, since "seat moves" are not allowed. Still, I usually do quite a bit of seat selection within my table selection: if a table has only one good target but that target would be directly on my left, I will usually not sit down, let someone else take the seat, and put my name back on the list again. I'd rather sit at one too few tables than sit in the perfectly wrong seat on an otherwise good-not-great table.

DeepCraft said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeepCraft View Post
For uNL.. as an normal 3-4tabling mofo playing 50NL or lower; table selection doesn't matter.
There's never a time that table selection DOESN'T matter. Sometimes table selection is less important, but it ALWAYS matters. Knowing the types of opponents that you can best exploit and packing your tables with them will bolster your winrate. If you play at $25NL it might boost your winrate from 8 PTBB/100 up to 12 PTBB/100. Now, you can argue that "8 PTBB/100 is a great winrate," but more winrate is always better, and passing up such a trivially easy opportunity to improve your score is a mistake.

Can you play winning poker without ever table selecting? Yes.

Can you optimize your winrate without ever table selecting? No.

Quote:
If you're ever considering to move up as a shark, you should know or at least have a rough idea of how to play all poker playing stiles. Rock, Nit, TAG, LAG and readjust to the game.
While that's true it has nothing to do with table selection. Just because you need to have multiple gears to play a successful game at higher stakes does not mean that you will not benefit from table selection. You could argue that table selection becomes one of the most important skills that a player can have at the SSNL levels and above.

Ignore table selection and your winrate will suffer.
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Old 06-21-2008, 06:50 PM   #16
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

ehhm... I'm not sure i agree with the premise of this post... i mean in the sense of categorizing table selection by playing style... i think playing non-thinking players/unknowns is the key thing/ or known fish/...I switch betweeen LAG and NIT all the time. the most important thing in my opinion as far as table selection goes at NL25 (i can't speak for other limits) is to be playing vs unknowns with half-stacks because they are generally goin to be felting all top pairs and draws. also when playing vs . a table full of regs leave or if there is 1 reg make sure u have notes on them.

Last edited by BSman12; 06-21-2008 at 07:00 PM.
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Old 06-21-2008, 09:51 PM   #17
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Very good post.

But what about a TAG? Or are TAGS called nits now? I switch styles quite a bit depending on tables, but usually run around 18-20 vpip and don't really consider myself a nit since I have to raise a lot of junk to get there, and am pretty aggresive post flop. Don't really consider myself weak tight either.

What tables that would be best suited for like 19/17/3.5?
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Old 06-21-2008, 10:34 PM   #18
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

i don't think i've ever table selected, that says a lot about me as a person imo
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Old 06-21-2008, 11:39 PM   #19
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Yeah I think TAG was left out, either for a reason(Pokey can be tricky) or just because he forgot. Because Weak-Tight definately doesn't describe a TAG, for obvious reasons. And neither does LAG obv.

When I look at table selection I look for tables that are +EV and adjust my style to them mostly. If playing LAG is best, I'll play that, if TAG is best, I'll play that. I usually play 4-6 tables, with my stats ranging from 30/23 to 13/10. I think we all know preflop stats are least important and postflop is more important.

Nit is never really good, though, and anyone playing a nit style should improve their play. Personally I'd classify nits as below 15% vpip though so I guess what seems to be the 2+2 accepted TAG at 20/18 would be a nit by Pokey's preflop classifications?

Regardless of what anyone says though, table selection is important at uNL. If not for any other reason than at least you've practiced for when you move up, when it does become (more) important.

Edit: For the most part these are good guidelines though because the majority of players at uNL just aren't experienced enough to change gears, etc. Learning to exploit players leaks and weaknesses is the most important trait in poker, if you can't do that you're screwed no matter what level you play at. So figure out your style, exploit those you match up well against, and work on your game in the meantime to beat others. Pokey you've inspired me I think I may start to write some articles too for uNL.
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Old 06-22-2008, 12:28 AM   #20
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Pokey you are my hero.
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Old 06-22-2008, 12:36 AM   #21
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

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Yeah I think TAG was left out, either for a reason(Pokey can be tricky) or just because he forgot. Because Weak-Tight definately doesn't describe a TAG, for obvious reasons. And neither does LAG obv.
If you look at my descriptions, a TAG falls under the "weak-tight" category. Please don't be offended: I'm not meaning "weak-tight" as a harsh criticism, here. If it makes you feel better, you can think of it this way -- I gave descriptions of general play styles. One is tight/aggressive, two is tight/passive, and three is loose/aggressive. Within each category, there are also quality issues. So a tight/aggressive player who is also relatively good at poker would be considered "TAG," but a tight/aggressive player who was mediocre or bad at poker would be considered "weak/tight." A tight/passive player who was relatively good at poker would be considered a "nit" but a tight/passive player who was relatively bad at poker would be considered a "mouse." A loose/aggressive player who was relatively good at poker would be called a "LAG" but a loose/aggressive player who was relatively bad at poker would be called a "maniac."

I don't think there are terribly many good tight/aggressive players at uNL simply because if you play a good, tight, and aggressive game you'll win so much that you'll probably rapidly move up out of the uNL ranges. Since this primer was targetted at people who are struggling with the game, I figured I'd expand beyond the most basic, obvious, and winning form of poker into slight deviations from center.

Again, please don't take offense -- it wasn't intended as an insult.

Quote:
Personally I'd classify nits as below 15% vpip though so I guess what seems to be the 2+2 accepted TAG at 20/18 would be a nit by Pokey's preflop classifications?
Shades of grey, my friend; shades of grey. Whenever I put a number in one of these posts it should be seen as a VERY rough guideline, rather than some absolute immutable law of the table. I think everybody would agree that a 12/10 is playing a nitty game and a 33/27 is playing a LAGgy game; where we draw the line between these categories is going to be arbitrary. In fact, it is often the case that the difference between a "nit" and a "TAG" is the REST of the table: preflop stats that would be considered nitty at the $0.02/$0.04 tables might be considered semi-loose at the $2/$4 tables. Similarly, the number of players at the table makes a difference. Don't tie yourself too tightly to the exact boundaries that I chose; rather, realize that if you are on the looser end of "nit" you should read the "weak-tight" section as well and pick-and-choose for best personal gain.

Quote:
Learning to exploit players leaks and weaknesses is the most important trait in poker, if you can't do that you're screwed no matter what level you play at. So figure out your style, exploit those you match up well against, and work on your game in the meantime to beat others.
I couldn't have said it better myself. The whole point of this post is to think beyond cookie-cutters and realize that your game has exploitive strengths and exploitable weaknesses; as such, you should look for opponents who are least likely to exploit your weaknesses and most likely to fall victim to your strengths.

Quote:
Pokey you've inspired me I think I may start to write some articles too for uNL.
Sounds like I actually accomplished something! I look forward to seeing them.
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Old 06-22-2008, 12:39 AM   #22
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Man pokey up really late tonight
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Old 06-22-2008, 01:02 AM   #23
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Pokey, I think we're actually agreeing lol even though I guess it may look like we're having a disagreement. I did say TAG would probably fall under Weak-Tight in your analysis. I also said your post was a great guideline as well. As with everything in poker, "it depends."

Of course Weak-Tight has a negative connotation around here. I see plenty senior citizens grinding out their social security playing weak tight in the So Cal casinos. I'd rather be Weak-Tight than a Nit, which also has a negative connotation but also has it's place.

And I wasn't offended. I've focused on playing all styles so saying I'm one type of player that's percieved as a negative style isn't going to offend me. I'm not a uNL player, just wanted to get a lil more analysis outta ya.

Great post.
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Old 06-22-2008, 01:07 AM   #24
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

Quote:
Originally Posted by EMc View Post
Man pokey up really late tonight
Well, it's bingo night at the senior citizen's hall, so they let us stay up past 8pm. AJ and I are both after the same hot lil' widow, but I think he's got the inside track, since he's got most of his original teeth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThaHero
I'm not a uNL player, just wanted to get a lil more analysis outta ya.
Wow...since when is getting me to talk more considered an accomplishment? If you want to do something impressive, you should try to get me to shut up.
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Old 06-22-2008, 01:18 AM   #25
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Re: Introduction to Table Selection

I have been been saving this picture for a while



Back on topic, excellent post as per usual
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