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Old 12-16-2018, 03:24 PM   #126
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Don't Hesitate, Young People! (Tetsu Taguchi, 1935) -- lost film



Starring: Setsuko Hara, Shintar˘ Takiguchi, Ichir˘ Izawa

This lost silent film marked the screen debut of Setsuko Hara. She was born in 1920 in Yokohama, Japan, and studied in high school to become a teacher. But at the urging of her older brother-in-law, director Hisatora Kumagai, she dropped out of school and moved to Tokyo, where she was hired by Nikkatsu studios on her second try.

In 2000, Kinema Junpo declared her the #1 Japanese actress of the 20th century.





This film was a relatively obscure adolescent drama, involving a mom who manages a stationary shop in a small country town. She has a pretty daughter who all the boys and girls want to socialize with. But business isn't good and since it's the Great Depression, the family runs up a debt they can't pay back; it's suggested that Setsuko marry someone's son and everything will turn out alright.

Not quite Disney Channel but most likely it was the 1930s Japanese equivalent. Unlikely the film was ever seen again after it left theaters in 1935.

Thankfully, a few still photographs did survive!





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Old 12-23-2018, 04:24 PM   #127
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Midnight Sun (Fumito Kurata, 1935) -- lost film

Absolutely nothing remains of this lost silent film, a contemporary drama in which Setsuko Hara played the main character's daughter, Kimie.

The script was written by Hideo Oguni, who later co-wrote the screenplays for Akira Kurosawa's Ikiru, Seven Samurai, Throne of Blood, and The Hidden Fortress.






Not even any pictures remain from the film, but I did like this artwork based on a photo of Hara from around the time.

Pre-WWII Nikkatsu films were the worst in the world when it comes to preservation -- nearly all of them are lost. Very few survive.

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Old 12-26-2018, 06:48 PM   #128
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Schedule for Week #12:

Movie of the Week: Throw Your Spirit (Tetsu Taguchi, 1935)

--------------------------------------------------------------------

This young person's baseball film was long thought to be lost, but a good portion of it turned up in 2011 and was released as a DVD supplement by Shincho 45.

Starring: Setsuko Hara, still an unknown teenager, but her earliest surviving film.

Silent, Black and White, with Japanese intertitles. I am having these translated and as soon as I receive my copy, I will post a review in the new year.
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Old 02-14-2019, 06:02 AM   #129
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Movie of the Week #12:

Throw Your Spirit (Tetsu Taguchi, 1935)



Starring: Setsuko Hara, Ichir˘ Izawa, Hideo Nakamura, et. al
Written by: Eiji Tamagawa and Suishű Tobita
Cinematography by: Torajiro Fukuda

Silent, Black and White, 27 minutes (extant). Drama

Review:

This was the last of three youth films Setsuko Hara appeared in when she was first signed by Nikkatsu in the summer of 1935. The original version was 65 minutes long.

Izawa and Hayasaki (Ichir˘ Izawa and Hideo Nakamura) are two star players on their high school baseball team. Izawa's dad doesn't want him to play anymore because he thinks baseball is a waste of time. Hayasaki falls grievously ill. Needless to say, things are not looking good for our heroes or their high school team as they prepare to play in the big game.





But there's good news! Little Noriko shows up, playing Hayasaki's unnamed sister, the unofficial cheerleader for the team. She's not asked to do a lot in this movie, mostly just smile and look cute and joyful, but she does those things exceedingly well. There's one scene where she visits a temple to pray for her sick brother, but even then, she tempers her worry and concern by simultaneously expressing complete faith and optimistic hope.


(Setsuko Hara in Throw Your Spirit, 1935)




The best part of the movie takes place when Izawa and Little Noriko go on a play date together one day at the beach. Since Izawa's father won't let him pitch anymore, he has secretly constructed some kind of mock strike zone dug into a sand dune, surrounded by rocks and padded with seaweed. Hara sits over to the side and uses seashells to record balls and strikes. The first pitch is good and she smiles. He sticks out his chest and looks proud. The next pitch hits one of the rocks and this time she laughs. "Ball!" It's a cute scene.


(Setsuko Hara and Ichir˘ Izawa in Throw Your Spirit, 1935)




Adam Mars-Jones once wrote a book called Noriko Smiling, and besides being a great actress, that's pretty much what Setsuko Hara was known for: her incomparable smile. In the same way that Ozu was called the tofu maker, who directed sweet tofu, dried tofu, pickled tofu, red tofu, etc. Hara had her many different types of smiles -- loving, kind, warm, and accepting smiles. Knowing smiles. Playful smiles. Sexy smiles. Don't-f***-with-me smiles. "Why does this woman keep smiling all the time? Is she insane?" smiles.

Here in this film, she's just 15 and the smiles are more like pure delight and joy. She has a terrific screen presence, one that cannot be described as acting. It's more like that is her natural state, in the same way that many of us might by default have a blank or busy look on our face.


Final Grade:

It's hard to rate 27 minutes from the middle of a movie that's half-missing, but Throw Your Spirit appears to have been a competent but also typical youth film. Most people will have seen adolescent movies like this in their life. According to the synopsis, after a coach convinces Izawa's father to let him rejoin the team, Hayasaki dies from his illness. Everyone else vows they will win the championship for their fallen teammate.

Izawa, of course, strikes out the last batter and wins the game.

That's probably as good as it gets for these kinds of movies, notwithstanding it was silent, but Throw Your Spirit will mostly be remembered as Setsuko Hara's earliest surviving film.






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Old 02-15-2019, 08:00 PM   #130
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

By the way the beach in this scene is the same one where Olympic surfing will make its debut next year at Tokyo 2020.

The beach is actually located across the bay in Chiba prefecture.




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Old 02-19-2019, 02:09 AM   #131
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Following those three initial youth films, Setsuko Hara got her first big break in her career:

Green Horizons Part 1 (Yutaka Abe, 1935) -- lost film



Starring: Reiko Hoshi, Setsuko Hara, Joji Oka, et. al

Green Horizons was an ensemble melodrama series, supposed to be one of Nikkatsu's biggest movies of the year. Sumiko Mizukubo was originally cast to play the lead actress, but she attempted to commit suicide in the middle of shooting. Fortunately she survived, but her acting career was finished. Co-star Reiko Hoshi was moved into her role, and in an emergency situation, Nikkatsu promoted Setsuko Hara to play the final female part.

Joji Oka was the main character, who falls in love with three different women. He and Mizukubo had both moved from Shochiku to Nikkatsu sometime after they starred in Ozu's Dragnet Girl.


(Sumiko Mizukubo before her suicide attempt in 1935)




As it was, Reiko Hoshi played the lead actress in the final version of the film. She became more famous later on, but here it can be said that the movie was not successful.

Perhaps it shouldn't be a surprise given the circumstances surrounding the production.




(Reiko Hoshi sometime during the 1930s)

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Old 02-19-2019, 02:14 AM   #132
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Green Horizons Part 2 (Yutaka Abe, 1935) -- lost film



Sometimes Japanese films were released in two parts, often in successive weeks. Setsuko Hara (above, left) played a dancing girl, one of the other major characters in the movie.

This was her first "talkie" and also her first popular culture film that was widely seen by the Japanese public. The theme song became more popular than Green Horizons itself. Modern singers still cover it until the present day.



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Old 02-22-2019, 01:08 AM   #133
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Schedule for Week #13:

Movie of the Week: Kōchiyama Sōshun (Sadao Yamanaka, 1936)

Also:
The Crown of Life (Tomu Uchida, 1936)

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Sadao Yamanaka was the first great Japanese period film director, before World War II. He was greatly admired by Ozu, Kurosawa, and others. He was also Ozu's good friend.

Yamanaka directed 26 films before he died in the war in China in the late 1930s, but only three of them survive-- Humanity and Paper Balloons and The Pot Worth a Million Ryo are both considered masterpieces and usually listed among the best Japanese films ever made.

Kōchiyama Sōshun is the lesser of the three, but it's still Sadao Yamanaka and it stars Setsuko Hara so ... looking forward to it!
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Old 02-22-2019, 08:48 PM   #134
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Ozu and Sadao Yamanaka, as they departed for Manchuria in 1937.



I feel like I'm going to appreciate the best Ozu films more as the culmination of something, which is why I'm enjoying watching all of these earlier films.

Obviously the war in China was an unjust, belligerent war of aggression, but when you take a step back you realize these were just two men (and major film directors) who were ordered at gunpoint to serve their country. Ozu survived the war but unfortunately, Yamanaka did not.

Ozu's very tombstone reads 'mu', the Chinese character for 'nothingness', which he learned from a local monk during the war in the late 1930s.

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Old 02-26-2019, 10:32 PM   #135
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Beautiful Woman in White Robe (Yutaka Abe, 1936) -- lost film



Starring: Irie Takako, Joji Oka, Setsuko Hara et. al

Hakui no kaijin was a follow-up to Green Horizons, another romantic drama directed by Yutaka Abe and starring Joji Oka. Irie Takako played opposite him as the lead actress.




Setsuko Hara was the little sister-- her second supporting role in a major film. Based on Green Horizons and White Robe, she was next cast to star in Sadao Yamanaka's Kōchiyama Sōshun.




Not much is left from this one except the soundtrack, but its Hawaiian guitar theme on phonograph is pretty cool.

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Old 03-10-2019, 12:23 AM   #136
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Movie of the Week #13:

Kōchiyama Sōshun (Sadao Yamanaka, 1936)



Starring: Ch˘jűr˘ Kawarasaki, Setsuko Hara, Kan'emon Nakamura
Written by: Mokuami Kawatake, Shintar˘ Mimura
Cinematography by: Harumi Machii

Black and White, 1 hour 22 minutes. Comedy, Drama

Review:

Long before Akira Kurosawa, the first great Japanese period film director was Sadao Yamanaka. He directed 26 films in the 1920s and 1930s, only three of which survive: The Pot Worth a Million Ryo (1935), a comedic masterpiece, Kōchiyama Sōshun (1936), sometimes referred to in English as Priest of Darkness, a transitional effort; and Humanity and Paper Balloons (1937), his final and most acclaimed film.

Yamanaka was just 28 years old when he died the following year in the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Kōchiyama Sōshun begins with a samurai named Kaneko (Kan'emon Nakamura) making his rounds through an urban street fair. Kaneko works for the local crime boss and collects bribes from all of the shopkeepers and stall owners. He has a crush on the sweet-sake girl, Onami (played by a young Setsuko Hara), so naturally she doesn't have to pay, but everyone else does. After awhile, the audience gets introduced to the other major characters: Kōchiyama himself (Ch˘jűr˘ Kawarasaki), an itinerant, layabout samurai with lots of swag; his wife Oshizu, who manages some kind of shady upstairs bar; and Onami's delinquent brother, Hirotaro, who steals a precious knife.


(Kan'emon Nakamura approaching Setsuko Hara in Kōchiyama Sōshun, 1936)




After Hirotaro steals the knife from a bumbling samurai named Daizen Kitamura, he's forced to hide out in the upstairs bar owned by Kōchiyama and his wife. Setsuko Hara, already typecast here as the virtuous and dutiful sister, comes around looking for her brother; and eventually, Kochiyama befriends the young Hirotaro and escorts him for a night of drinking at a geisha house, where he meets a childhood love, with dire consequences for all.

That's more or less the plot of Kōchiyama Sōshun, but where Yamanaka excelled was in his ability to seamlessly weave together disparate plot points into the comedic, the tragic, and the sublime.


(Ch˘jűr˘ Kawarasaki, right, as the title character Kōchiyama Sōshun, 1936)




There's a great scene early in the film, where Kōchiyama apparently gets duped into gambling against a chess hustler in a back-alley stall. He wagers a coin or two and wins, then he wagers more and loses, and then the hustler asks him to wager much more.

Quote:
Anything up to 10 ryo, and I will pay you five times if you win back. Please mister, wager at least one or two ryo.
Hirotaro warns Kōchiyama against gambling further, but thugs threaten the boy until he runs away. "I wager the maximum 10 ryo!" That's when Kōchiyama makes his move, and he out-hustles the hustler. Kōchiyama wins all 50 ryo. Whenever the two encounter each other in the rest of the movie, Kōchiyama gets excited and his eyes light up:

Quote:
Hey, chessman, it's you! Open your shop and play me another game.
The little man invariably scurries away, embarrassed, and it's always funny. No matter what else is going on in the movie, it never gets old.


(Setsuko Hara in Kōchiyama Sōshun, 1936)




The film does gradually get more serious. There are running gags and jokes about harakiri, but then there are deaths, murders, and suicides, as well as dramatic chases and a sword fight at the end.

Setsuko Hara's acting performance, here in her first extant "talkie", comes across as a little artificial. Her voice is too light and airy, seemingly shy and without confidence. There are times when Yamanaka obscures her face, intentionally hiding her emotions. Overall she's still very young in Kōchiyama Sōshun and at her best when she's the cute, impossibly sweet and innocent girl.

But there was one scene where little Noriko comes out-- when her brother's dishonorable mischief puts their very lives at stake:





After the slaps, she simultaneously expressed fear, sadness, hurt, anger, contempt, and disgust -- for her it was truly a great scene!


Final Grade:

Quote:
Great crimes, tragedies, and suffering occur alongside the silly, mundane, and lovely. This can be difficult to illustrate in a film but Sadao Yamanaka accomplished it in his great 1936 film, Kochiyama Soshun.
I came across that review online and I couldn't agree more. Kōchiyama Sōshun was funny and entertaining, but it was also tragic and sad. Ch˘jűr˘ Kawarasaki was particularly outstanding in the lead role, able to portray a character who was at times little more than a swindling, idle drunk, but other times very human and heroic, willing to sacrifice himself to the very end.

Solid 3/4 stars, with real drama and sword fighting at the end.



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Old 03-10-2019, 11:13 PM   #137
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)



By the way, all three surviving Yamanaka films were released on DVD with subtitles by Masters of Cinema:

The Pot Worth a Million Ryo
Kōchiyama Sōshun
Humanity and Paper Balloons

I would like to see the other two, hopefully they will be on Criterion Channel when it launches next month.

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Old 03-16-2019, 12:03 AM   #138
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Girls Before Marriage (Ren Yoshimura, 1936) -- lost film



Starring: Setsuko Hara, Kokiku Hanayagi, Katsumi Mikawa, et. al

This was an all-Japanese schoolgirl flick, probably meant as visual entertainment for boys and men. Hara (above, left) was the top actress in the film.


(Kokiku Hanayagi and Setsuko Hara in Girls Before Marriage, 1936)




That summer, Nikkatsu had all of their young actresses pose for a swimsuit pictorial at Atami Beach. These were a mix of high school and college aged girls, and most of the pictures were innocent enough, but the more mature ladies were asked to do some surprisingly suggestive poses.


(Setsuko Hara, far left, 1936)




(Kiyo Kuroda and Setsuko Hara, 1936)




Following this pictorial and her starring roles in Kōchiyama Sōshun and Girls Before Marriage, Hara was noticed by German director Arnold Fanck, who was scouting actors and actresses for his next film.

Fanck and Japanese director Mansaku Itami would both direct the infamous Nazi-German / Imperial Japanese co-production, The Daughter of the Samurai, the following year. Setsuko Hara was cast over Kinuyo Tanaka as the lead Japanese actress, and it was a special purpose government film, which made her an internationally famous movie star.

From this point forward, she only made brief appearances in her last few Nikkatsu pics, to finish out her contract.

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Old 03-17-2019, 03:22 PM   #139
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shuffle View Post
most of the pictures were innocent enough, but the more mature ladies were asked to do some surprisingly suggestive poses
For instance, same magazine, different Setsuko:


(Setsuko Shinobu, front, 1936)


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Old 05-07-2019, 01:51 AM   #140
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

The Crown of Life (Tomu Uchida, 1936)



Starring: J˘ji Oka, Shir˘ Izome, Setsuko Hara, Ichir˘ Izawa, et. al
Written by: Yasutarō Yagi
Cinematography by: Tatsuyuki Yokota
Special benshi narration by: Yorimitsu Sakamoto

Silent, Black and White, 55 minutes (extant). Drama

Review:

The Crown of Life was among the last silent films ever released by a major studio, and it's the last silent film in this Ozu-Setsuko Hara series. Most Japanese films had entered the sound era by 1936, however many of the provincial theaters were still not equipped for audio playback. Nikkatsu produced a few more silents like this one, which may have been targeted towards a more regional audience.

The story features two brothers, Kotaro (played by major star J˘ji Oka) and Kinjiro (Shir˘ Izome) who own a crab fishing and canning company in Moka, modern day Kholmsk, South Sakhalin Island, Russia. Kotaro is a righteous and honest man, serving as the film's moral center, while his brother cares only about money. One day when a ship fails to return to port, existential crisis follows, and the two brothers argue about how they should run their business. It's a maudlin and melodramatic film, not very interesting, but sometimes redeemed by the beautiful documentary-like footage it contains within.





The shooting location was actually Kunashiri-tō, more commonly known as Kunashir Island, the southernmost island in the Kuril Islands, just off the coast of Hokkaido, northern Japan. Soviet troops invaded in August 1945 and the Japanese population was forcefully expelled. The scenes are like a window in time, a look at a civilization that no longer exists there, instead replaced by Russian colonists.

Fans of the documentary series Deadliest Catch might especially enjoy the shots of crab fishing riding high on the waves in the rough Sea of Okhotsk. And look at the size of those crabs!



(Setsuko Hara and Hisako Takihana in The Crown of Life)




The original version of the film was 94 minutes long, and Setsuko Hara may have had more prominent screen time in the missing scenes, but as is she's nothing more than a sister in the background here, occasionally pouring sake for her brothers or their employees. I think she had one line in the entire extant film.

But by this point, her final Nikkatsu roles were merely supporting characters; she was already cast to star in the Nazi German / Imperial Japanese national co-production, The Daughter of the Samurai, released the following year.

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Old 05-09-2019, 11:12 PM   #141
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Tange Sazen Nikkō Volume (Kunio Watanabe, 1936) -- lost film



Starring: Denjirō Ōkōchi, Yatarō Kurokawa, Setsuko Hara, et. al


Another installment of the popular Tange Sazen series, starring Denjirō Ōkōchi in his usual role as the one-eyed, one-armed ronin. Setsuko Hara had a minor role, pictured above, age 16.

There were several of these movies released in Japan during the 1930s. Tange Sazen was initially conceived as a nihilistic samurai, but gradually evolved into Imperial Japan's equivalent of a superhero-- fighting against injustice. Denjirō Ōkōchi became synonymous with the role, and Sadao Yamanaka's comedic version, The Pot Worth a Million Ryo, was universally considered the best.





It's rumored there may be a few surviving seconds of the film. I will see if I can find these at the Toy Film Museum in Kyoto when I visit later this year.

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Old 05-11-2019, 02:58 PM   #142
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Schedule for Week #14:

Movie of the Week: The Daughter of the Samurai (Arnold Fanck, 1937)

---------------------------------------------------------------------

The Daughter of the Samurai was the infamous Nazi German / Imperial Japanese co-production, which first made Setsuko Hara an internationally famous movie star.

The film served two purposes: first, it was a diplomatic cover for negotiations surrounding the Anti-Comintern Pact, the treaty which brought the two fascist countries into alliance together, first against worldwide communism, and then against the Allies during World War II. Spies and diplomats were secretly embedded in both the German and Japanese crews.

Second, the film was also a cultural collaboration, meant to introduce Japan and Japanese people to their new German allies, and vice-versa. The great mountain film director, Arnold Fanck, was chosen to lead the German side. Fanck and his team traveled to Japan in 1936, where he scouted locations, as well as actors and directors with whom he might work. Mansaku Itami was chosen as his co-director, and then Setsuko Hara was cast as lead actress, after Fanck noticed her in Sadao Yamanaka's film, Kōchiyama Sōshun.

In truth, the production was a disaster, as the Nazis tried to take over everything. The Germans and Japanese essentially made two different movies using the same actors and same script. Itami's version, The New Earth, was universally derided, and it's very rarely screened today. Fanck's version, despite critical reviews of exoticism in Japan, was a major success. It's of course a very problematic film today, filled with Nazi ideology, but at the time, tens of thousands of people cheered Setsuko Hara as she departed on her worldwide tour to promote the film throughout much of 1937: Berlin, Paris, New York, Hollywood (where she was chaperoned by Marlene Dietrich), and then back to Japan.

Should be interesting. Looking forward to it!



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Old 05-15-2019, 03:28 AM   #143
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Tomorrow, Wednesday night in Chicago:






Ozu's Dragnet Girl, with live music score performed by Coupler. Purchased my tickets and really looking forward to this. See you there!

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Old 05-16-2019, 08:55 PM   #144
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Dragnet Girl -- live trip report:

Hij˘sen no onna
Music Box Theater in Chicago.
Capacity 800. Not full, but several hundred in attendance.
Electronic music group Coupler with the live original score.
Painfully slow first 5-10 minutes; really picked up after that.
A 35mm print!
Ozu on the big screen: ****ing amazing.
You don't understand how good the editing in this movie was.
You don't understand how good the photography in this movie was.
Sharp cut on movement after sharp cut on movement.
Rapid fire insert shots.
Kinuyo Tanaka? Tiny woman but sexy as **** at 23 on the big screen.
That low camera angle makes everyone look larger than life.

For most of the film, the music was excellent. I've seen Dragnet Girl a bunch of times on the Criterion DVD, and some of the melodrama and apartment scenes are dull. But the music group did a great job bridging together scenes and sequences. Watching along with a few hundred other people, I would say this was a unique and superior viewing experience.

Except!!!!

The last 20-25 minutes. Those are the holy grail, somewhere on my Mt. Rushmore of movie-watching experiences. Awful music choices...4 different arrangements...didn't build towards any kind of climax... couple of them were downright silly and juvenile, ruining the ending.

Finished my popcorn, soda, and canned lemon whiskey drink?
Went to the grill next door and ate herb-roasted chicken breast.
Garlic mashed potatoes, green bean almandine, sauce veloutÚ.
Argentinian Malbec wine.

Not a bad evening. Won $400+ at PLO on the way home. Immediately watched those last 20-25 minutes on my Dragnet Girl DVD. Thanks for music, Coupler and Neil Brand.
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Old 05-16-2019, 09:00 PM   #145
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Real nice trip report, Shuffle.
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Old 05-16-2019, 10:46 PM   #146
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

I'm envious. Great report. Sorry about the music.

I know nothing of film making, scoring, or even of music, but I'm tempted to try and score the last 20 minutes myself. Dragnet Girl is one of my favorites. It might be fun to try a Youtube mashup.
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Old 05-17-2019, 08:21 PM   #147
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Thanks guys. The music was actually really good except for the ending. Still well worth the experience. The show even got a write-up in the Chicago Tribune.


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Old 05-18-2019, 12:08 AM   #148
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

A little OT, but some of these street snaps reminded me of Dragnet Girl and other Ozu work from the 1930s.

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/g...P=share_btn_tw
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Old 05-18-2019, 11:22 AM   #149
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

Those are beautiful, Mack. I love that kind of stuff. Thanks for sharing.
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Old 05-19-2019, 04:47 PM   #150
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Re: Watch Ozu with Me (plus the films of his muse, Setsuko Hara)

The Prosecutor and His Sister (Kunio Watanabe, 1937) -- lost film



Starring: J˘ji Oka, Setsuko Hara

Two siblings lost their parents at a young age and grow up alone. The older brother becomes a public prosecutor, while his younger sister plans to marry his professional rival.





This was Setsuko Hara's last film with Nikkatsu. At the request of the German side, the Ministry of Culture had her sign with JO Studio, which was producing The Daughter of the Samurai.

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