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11-11-2009 , 12:01 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Utah
Definitely worth posting. Certainly not worth the risk, imo. There are a lot of birthing centers that try to have a homier feeling than a hospital but the technology and trained staff are there as well.

If you want to go with a midwife look for a certified nurse midwife vs the lay midwife.
Can you clarify the difference between the two?

Are many birthing centers covered under health insurance? I know that home births typically aren't, and getting the proper medical staff to your house can be quite expensive.
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11-11-2009 , 01:07 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by James282
Can you clarify the difference between the two?

Are many birthing centers covered under health insurance? I know that home births typically aren't, and getting the proper medical staff to your house can be quite expensive.
Lay midwives have no medical training. Certified Nurse midwives are nurses first with an advanced degree in midwifery. Often if affiliated with a hospital or birthing center they have an MD back up. That would be something I would look for.

Here are a list a definitions that may help
http://mana.org/definitions.html#CNM

I can only speak of what I know around here but this is a hospital that has a very extensive birthing type center-and there midwife program
http://www.healtheast.org/clinics/sp.../midwives.cfm#

http://www.woodwinds.org/CareService...nity/index.cfm
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11-12-2009 , 07:56 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by James282
Has anyone here tried a home birth, or know of anybody who tried one? I find the possibility intriguing.

James
Please, James, you're a smart guy. Don't allow you and your wife (?) be dissuaded by the "babies should be born at home/natural birth" cabal. Having a baby at home makes less sense than having open heart surgery at home. If my wife and I had a home birth, when my third child start breathing irregularly after birth, there is a very good chance at a minimum she would have had brain damage due to lack of oxygen, and possibly much, much worse. At the hospital, she was immediately treated at the NIC-U, and as such is fine today. I have yet to hear a single good reason for a home birth when hospital birth is also available. Not one. Almost the same goes for whether to take painkillers, although some have reactions to epidurals, etc. As far as I am concerned, the whole natural birth movement is anti-woman and provably not even close to as safe for mother and child. Just doing a quick search on statistics for complications and even deaths in hospital births vs home births should change your mind pretty quickly.

You would be well served PM'ing Irieguy about this subject too. When not playing poker and being generally awesome, he moonlights as a gynecologist, (an actual licensed one, not amateur.)
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11-12-2009 , 08:36 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daliman
Please, James, you're a smart guy. Don't allow you and your wife (?) be dissuaded by the "babies should be born at home/natural birth" cabal. Having a baby at home makes less sense than having open heart surgery at home. If my wife and I had a home birth, when my third child start breathing irregularly after birth, there is a very good chance at a minimum she would have had brain damage due to lack of oxygen, and possibly much, much worse. At the hospital, she was immediately treated at the NIC-U, and as such is fine today. I have yet to hear a single good reason for a home birth when hospital birth is also available. Not one. Almost the same goes for whether to take painkillers, although some have reactions to epidurals, etc. As far as I am concerned, the whole natural birth movement is anti-woman and provably not even close to as safe for mother and child. Just doing a quick search on statistics for complications and even deaths in hospital births vs home births should change your mind pretty quickly.

You would be well served PM'ing Irieguy about this subject too. When not playing poker and being generally awesome, he moonlights as a gynecologist, (an actual licensed one, not amateur.)

Are you implying that I am an amateur?

Honestly, I would never recommend a home delivery-I try to be respectful of what people are asking about and try to keep an open mind.
I have had to resuscitate too many babies or have had to manage postpartum hemorrhages (often after the doctor has finished and left the floor...and yes, they do come back and are there when we need them to be, thankfully), pts with eclampsia...etc.

I have seen enough of the scary things that can happen. Its not worth the risk in my opinion.

But asking Irieguy is a great suggestion...maybe he would even post here too. I would love to here his thoughts on home birth.

Paging Irieguy....
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11-12-2009 , 09:29 PM
To quote the article I linked:

Quote:
More than 10,000 American women each year choose planned homebirth with a homebirth midwife in the mistaken belief that it is a safe choice. In fact, homebirth with a homebirth midwife is the most dangerous form of planned birth in the US.

In 2003 the US standard birth certificate form was revised to include place of birth and attendant at birth. In both the 2003 and 2004 Linked Birth Infant Death Statistics, mention was made of this data, but it was not included in the reports. Now the CDC has made the entire dataset available for review and the statistics for homebirth are quite remarkable. Homebirth increases the risk of neonatal death to double or triple the neonatal death rate at hospital birth.
You folks can probably guess my feelings on the matter for several reasons, but I'd just like to point out that I agree strongly with Daliman.

I used to have this general sense that natural was better. It turns out that death is extremely natural.
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11-12-2009 , 09:48 PM
Cool, thanks for the info. When I said "intrigued," i meant it. It's obviously not something I'd ever consider without doing due diligence, or something I'd do if the risk to the child was even minutely higher.

It is definitely much more helpful to think of things in terms of "two to three times more risk" than "Oh, only 4 kids per every few thousand are at higher risk!" Eliminating all risk obviously needs to be the first concern.


On the same token - has anyone seen any research as to the effects of medical interventions on the safety to the child? The home-birth camp seems to imply that there are additional risks in using things like pitocin, c-sections, epidurals, and so on. Just curious if there are any on the MD side who have heard similar or contrary things.

Thanks!

James
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11-12-2009 , 10:49 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by James282
Cool, thanks for the info. When I said "intrigued," i meant it. It's obviously not something I'd ever consider without doing due diligence, or something I'd do if the risk to the child was even minutely higher.

It is definitely much more helpful to think of things in terms of "two to three times more risk" than "Oh, only 4 kids per every few thousand are at higher risk!" Eliminating all risk obviously needs to be the first concern.


On the same token - has anyone seen any research as to the effects of medical interventions on the safety to the child? The home-birth camp seems to imply that there are additional risks in using things like pitocin, c-sections, epidurals, and so on. Just curious if there are any on the MD side who have heard similar or contrary things.

Thanks!

James
Of course there are additional risks; the question, as always, is whether the risks outweigh the benefits, which they overwhelmingly do. ALL risk can never truly be eliminated, but hospital is EASILY the best and safest option, and it isn't close.
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11-12-2009 , 10:52 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Utah
Are you implying that I am an amateur?

Honestly, I would never recommend a home delivery-I try to be respectful of what people are asking about and try to keep an open mind.
I have had to resuscitate too many babies or have had to manage postpartum hemorrhages (often after the doctor has finished and left the floor...and yes, they do come back and are there when we need them to be, thankfully), pts with eclampsia...etc.

I have seen enough of the scary things that can happen. Its not worth the risk in my opinion.

But asking Irieguy is a great suggestion...maybe he would even post here too. I would love to here his thoughts on home birth.

Paging Irieguy....
Actually, I was referencing the fact that most of us guys are amateur gynecologists. Kinda like my fave shirt.

"I'm not a gynecologist, but I'll have a look".
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11-12-2009 , 10:53 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daliman
Actually, I was referencing the fact that most of us guys are amateur gynecologists. Kinda like my fave shirt.

"I'm not a gynecologist, but I'll have a look".

I was kidding....
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11-12-2009 , 11:01 PM
The pic from the hospital was kinda boring so I'm giving you this as well. (Full disclosure: it's staged b/c I wanted to show him off in his coolest shirt, despite it being slightly to big for him atm and not seasonally appropriate. Rest assured he was blanketed immediately before and after.)



As for the 8 days he's been around, after an easy 6.5 hour birth and fairly quiet 36 hours, his weight had dropped too much in our pediatrician's opinion (7 lbs 11 oz to 6 lbs 13 oz in under 2 days) and we were kept an additional night and did 4-5 feedings of S&S (formula and breastfeeding at the same time via a small tube). Weight got back up to 7 lbs 1 oz and we left the hospital Saturday morning.

Had our first Pediatrician visit Monday morning and got a call later that day that his follow up biliruben (sic?), a test for jaundice, had almost doubled since we left the hospital (from 10.8 to 21.8) and that he needed to be readmitted back into the hospital for treatment.

Treatment consisted of 24 hours of being under the bili-lights and on a bili-blanket (think fake sun-tanning complete with face mask tight enough so that he couldn't pull it off). There was concern that it might be an infection so we weren't allowed to feed for the first 4 hours until they could run some more tests and another biliruben, which they did around 10 pm. Asking about the results every time a nurse came in from about 2 am to 3 am, we were finally told around 3:30 that the lab had lost that test and they would need to do another one. Finally got the results at 6 am and were given the go-ahead to feed him after a total of about 12 hours without. They did give him an IV, so he wasn't starving hungry as far as we could tell, but there was a good 6 hours or so where he pretty much cried straight through. Definitely tough for a first-time parent (as it would be for any parent, LDO). Then he slept pretty much straight through except for feedings every 2.5 hours or so.

He went another 12 hours under the bili-lights and got his number down to 11.9 so he went off the lights and we had to wait another 12 hours to make sure it didn't spike up again. Left the hospital after a total of about 45 hours at 12.9 which we were told was good. He was feeding well and pooping well.

Had another follow up appointment today and his score is back up to ~16.9 so he's now back on just the bili-blanket (thankfully at home) which is much more easily manageable, but still frustrating given that we thought we were done with the whole thing. We go back for another test tomorrow.

Still... in the grand scheme of things, there are much worse things that could have been and we're thankful that he's generally healthy (or will be soon). We've been in a pretty good teamwork groove and have gotten some sleep and are coping pretty well all things considered. What doesn't kill us makes us stronger and whatnot...
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11-12-2009 , 11:16 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leroy2DaBeroy
The pic from the hospital was kinda boring so I'm giving you this as well. (Full disclosure: it's staged b/c I wanted to show him off in his coolest shirt, despite it being slightly to big for him atm and not seasonally appropriate. Rest assured he was blanketed immediately before and after.)



As for the 8 days he's been around, after an easy 6.5 hour birth and fairly quiet 36 hours, his weight had dropped too much in our pediatrician's opinion (7 lbs 11 oz to 6 lbs 13 oz in under 2 days) and we were kept an additional night and did 4-5 feedings of S&S (formula and breastfeeding at the same time via a small tube). Weight got back up to 7 lbs 1 oz and we left the hospital Saturday morning.

Had our first Pediatrician visit Monday morning and got a call later that day that his follow up biliruben (sic?), a test for jaundice, had almost doubled since we left the hospital (from 10.8 to 21.8) and that he needed to be readmitted back into the hospital for treatment.

Treatment consisted of 24 hours of being under the bili-lights and on a bili-blanket (think fake sun-tanning complete with face mask tight enough so that he couldn't pull it off). There was concern that it might be an infection so we weren't allowed to feed for the first 4 hours until they could run some more tests and another biliruben, which they did around 10 pm. Asking about the results every time a nurse came in from about 2 am to 3 am, we were finally told around 3:30 that the lab had lost that test and they would need to do another one. Finally got the results at 6 am and were given the go-ahead to feed him after a total of about 12 hours without. They did give him an IV, so he wasn't starving hungry as far as we could tell, but there was a good 6 hours or so where he pretty much cried straight through. Definitely tough for a first-time parent (as it would be for any parent, LDO). Then he slept pretty much straight through except for feedings every 2.5 hours or so.

He went another 12 hours under the bili-lights and got his number down to 11.9 so he went off the lights and we had to wait another 12 hours to make sure it didn't spike up again. Left the hospital after a total of about 45 hours at 12.9 which we were told was good. He was feeding well and pooping well.

Had another follow up appointment today and his score is back up to ~16.9 so he's now back on just the bili-blanket (thankfully at home) which is much more easily manageable, but still frustrating given that we thought we were done with the whole thing. We go back for another test tomorrow.

Still... in the grand scheme of things, there are much worse things that could have been and we're thankful that he's generally healthy (or will be soon). We've been in a pretty good teamwork groove and have gotten some sleep and are coping pretty well all things considered. What doesn't kill us makes us stronger and whatnot...
Glad things are getting better-

That jump in bilirubin is pretty scary. Its good that it was caught and its getting better. He does not look too orange in the picture.

He is a very cute little guy.
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11-13-2009 , 12:17 AM
suuuuper cute Leroy. Love the Marley shirt.


Dali,

I am aware there are risks and benefits. It seems obvious that birthing in a hospital seems the safest option. Moving past that, I was asking specifically if anyone knows any good reading on the risks/rewards of various interventions. My admittedly ignorant view of epidurals, for instance, is that I have a tough time believing they increase the safety of the baby. It seems as though numbing the area would make it harder to push. But then, I don't know.

I don't mean to derail this great thread though, if people feel that this conversation is doing so, I can take it elsewhere. Thanks!
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11-13-2009 , 03:05 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by James282
suuuuper cute Leroy. Love the Marley shirt.


Dali,

I am aware there are risks and benefits. It seems obvious that birthing in a hospital seems the safest option. Moving past that, I was asking specifically if anyone knows any good reading on the risks/rewards of various interventions. My admittedly ignorant view of epidurals, for instance, is that I have a tough time believing they increase the safety of the baby. It seems as though numbing the area would make it harder to push. But then, I don't know.

I don't mean to derail this great thread though, if people feel that this conversation is doing so, I can take it elsewhere. Thanks!
Epidurals reduce stress/pain on the mother, which is always better for the baby, as well as allows her to push with FAR less pain, reducing fatigue and increasing how long she can push for. The area actually being numbed by an epidural is not doing any/much pushing AFAIK. Beyond that, yeah, hit Irieguy up.
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11-13-2009 , 11:18 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daliman
Epidurals reduce stress/pain on the mother, which is always better for the baby, as well as allows her to push with FAR less pain, reducing fatigue and increasing how long she can push for. The area actually being numbed by an epidural is not doing any/much pushing AFAIK. Beyond that, yeah, hit Irieguy up.

What he said...

What will often happen is by taking the pain away from the mother she may actually dilate faster. It allows her to relax and rest. An epidural has to be timed though....to early and it can halt labor but if its well timed, can push it right along.

Most women can still feel the pressure of the contractions, not the pain. As the baby drops further down the pressure will increase. The baby's head will be pushing against mom's rectum and making her feel like she has to have a bowel movement.

Some women will feel more than others because the medication that is in the epidural space will migrate and be picked up by the nerve roots. Some of the nerve roots will absorb more medication than others and so some women will feel more than others. Some will be able to move and reposition in bed and others cannot do so without help. Leaving a patient on one side for too long will result in one side of her body being more numb as the medication will drift some with gravity.

The nice thing with an epidural, esp for a first time mom (or we have an baby that is not coming down straight, a bigger baby etc) is when she gets to complete there may be a a couple of hours of pushing ahead of her. She may be fully dilated but that baby still has to descend deep into the birth canal and be pushed under the pubic bone. It takes time. If a mom is comfortable with her epidural she can "labor down". Literally rest while her body continues to contract and push the baby down for her. If I can reduce her pushing by 30-60 minutes then its better for her and the baby. Often times we will turn the epidural off when its time to push. Its a gradual decrease in the analgesic effect but it increases mom's awareness as to where to push. I can easily spend 30 minutes just getting a mom to know where and how to push.

An epidural is an invasive procedure and an informed consent needs to be signed. We, the nurses, usually do the initial teaching because when the MDA comes up she is usually in too much pain to listen to the risks.
Primarily, infection and bleeding as they are breaking the skin. Damage to muscle and nerves, spinal headache, paralysis. All very rare. Usually tenderness and bruising at the site. A high block can occur too. If the med(usually marcaine and or fentanyl) is injected into the epidural space. The MDA gives a test does to make sure they are not in a blood vessel or giving a spinal . They will ask if mom can wiggle her toes, if she has a racing heart, metallic taste in her mouth, ringing in her ears. I have not had this ever happen to a patient. Sometimes the med will drop mom's blood pressure so she is monitored carefully, BP's every 3 minutes for about 30 minutes and longer is unstable. We give ephedrine IV to stabilize this. Mom's do ok with it, baby's do not always tolerate a dropping maternal bp.

From there mom is on her side, laying down until delivery with regular repositioning. Once numb we place a foley catheter to keep the bladder empty and out of the way. The cath is pulled once we start pushing.

Usually 2-3 hours after the epidural is turned off mom can stand with assistance.
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11-13-2009 , 11:48 AM
Wow, Mrs. Utah - thank you so much for all the information. There is really no substitute for a first hand account of how these things go. The concept of "laboring down" is one I had not heard of, nor considered. Thanks a lot for taking the time.

James
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11-14-2009 , 04:15 AM
I'm a DAD! Alyah was born on Monday nov 9th in the evening. I cannot not even put into words how amazing being a father feels. I am basically the most emotionless person you could ever meet, probably somewhat do to poker, but when I held my beautiful baby girl and looked into her eyes for the first time I cried for the first time since i was probably like 12, I'm also usually a person that is very unaffectionate and mostly shy with a few people around, I was running around huggin everyone like a crazy man. It was the best day of my life and I cant wait to watch her grow, I just feel like my life is 10x more important and meaningful than it was a week ago.
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11-14-2009 , 04:21 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Utah
What he said...

What will often happen is by taking the pain away from the mother she may actually dilate faster. It allows her to relax and rest. An epidural has to be timed though....to early and it can halt labor but if its well timed, can push it right along.

Most women can still feel the pressure of the contractions, not the pain. As the baby drops further down the pressure will increase. The baby's head will be pushing against mom's rectum and making her feel like she has to have a bowel movement.

Some women will feel more than others because the medication that is in the epidural space will migrate and be picked up by the nerve roots. Some of the nerve roots will absorb more medication than others and so some women will feel more than others. Some will be able to move and reposition in bed and others cannot do so without help. Leaving a patient on one side for too long will result in one side of her body being more numb as the medication will drift some with gravity.

The nice thing with an epidural, esp for a first time mom (or we have an baby that is not coming down straight, a bigger baby etc) is when she gets to complete there may be a a couple of hours of pushing ahead of her. She may be fully dilated but that baby still has to descend deep into the birth canal and be pushed under the pubic bone. It takes time. If a mom is comfortable with her epidural she can "labor down". Literally rest while her body continues to contract and push the baby down for her. If I can reduce her pushing by 30-60 minutes then its better for her and the baby. Often times we will turn the epidural off when its time to push. Its a gradual decrease in the analgesic effect but it increases mom's awareness as to where to push. I can easily spend 30 minutes just getting a mom to know where and how to push.

An epidural is an invasive procedure and an informed consent needs to be signed. We, the nurses, usually do the initial teaching because when the MDA comes up she is usually in too much pain to listen to the risks.
Primarily, infection and bleeding as they are breaking the skin. Damage to muscle and nerves, spinal headache, paralysis. All very rare. Usually tenderness and bruising at the site. A high block can occur too. If the med(usually marcaine and or fentanyl) is injected into the epidural space. The MDA gives a test does to make sure they are not in a blood vessel or giving a spinal . They will ask if mom can wiggle her toes, if she has a racing heart, metallic taste in her mouth, ringing in her ears. I have not had this ever happen to a patient. Sometimes the med will drop mom's blood pressure so she is monitored carefully, BP's every 3 minutes for about 30 minutes and longer is unstable. We give ephedrine IV to stabilize this. Mom's do ok with it, baby's do not always tolerate a dropping maternal bp.

From there mom is on her side, laying down until delivery with regular repositioning. Once numb we place a foley catheter to keep the bladder empty and out of the way. The cath is pulled once we start pushing.

Usually 2-3 hours after the epidural is turned off mom can stand with assistance.
This is def true, my fiance took like 8- 9 hours to get to 4cm dialted, they gave her the epiderol ( which the shot process really wasnt fun for her) and she went from 4cm to 6 in like an hour or 2 then went from 6-10 in like an hour. Also she was in sooo much pain even at 4cm, I cant imagine what it would of been like without a epiderol, mad props for anyone who is that tough.
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11-14-2009 , 01:22 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by putdaWHUMPonum
I'm a DAD! Alyah was born on Monday nov 9th in the evening. I cannot not even put into words how amazing being a father feels. I am basically the most emotionless person you could ever meet, probably somewhat do to poker, but when I held my beautiful baby girl and looked into her eyes for the first time I cried for the first time since i was probably like 12, I'm also usually a person that is very unaffectionate and mostly shy with a few people around, I was running around huggin everyone like a crazy man. It was the best day of my life and I cant wait to watch her grow, I just feel like my life is 10x more important and meaningful than it was a week ago.
mucho mucho congrats , I hope my day comes soon, we're not trying yet... but i'm warming her up to the idea of it within the next yr (post-wedding)
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11-14-2009 , 01:48 PM
Congrats to everyone on their new babies! The pictures are wonderful.

I don't know how you do it, Mrs Utah. After spending 6 weeks on the OB unit I don't think I'm cut out for this line of work. First of all, I cried every time I saw a baby. I don't have to tell you, this does not look professional! I literally broke out in tears at the two births I attended. I was trying not to blubber like an idiot.

Secondly, watching women hemorrhage after delivering is my least favorite thing to do. I would rather empty bed pans all day than watch a woman hemorrhage. Holy moly. My eyes were round as saucers (like this ) and I'm sure the look on my face was anything but professional. I wanted to run out of that unit and never come back. So my hat's off to you for being able to handle this very stressful job. It was probably the freakiest thing I've ever had to witness.
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11-15-2009 , 08:20 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by PrimordialAA
mucho mucho congrats , I hope my day comes soon, we're not trying yet... but i'm warming her up to the idea of it within the next yr (post-wedding)
TyTy, have fun in EU ( was talking to mjw the other day)
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11-15-2009 , 08:22 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leroy2DaBeroy
The pic from the hospital was kinda boring so I'm giving you this as well. (Full disclosure: it's staged b/c I wanted to show him off in his coolest shirt, despite it being slightly to big for him atm and not seasonally appropriate. Rest assured he was blanketed immediately before and after.)



As for the 8 days he's been around, after an easy 6.5 hour birth and fairly quiet 36 hours, his weight had dropped too much in our pediatrician's opinion (7 lbs 11 oz to 6 lbs 13 oz in under 2 days) and we were kept an additional night and did 4-5 feedings of S&S (formula and breastfeeding at the same time via a small tube). Weight got back up to 7 lbs 1 oz and we left the hospital Saturday morning.

Had our first Pediatrician visit Monday morning and got a call later that day that his follow up biliruben (sic?), a test for jaundice, had almost doubled since we left the hospital (from 10.8 to 21.8) and that he needed to be readmitted back into the hospital for treatment.

Treatment consisted of 24 hours of being under the bili-lights and on a bili-blanket (think fake sun-tanning complete with face mask tight enough so that he couldn't pull it off). There was concern that it might be an infection so we weren't allowed to feed for the first 4 hours until they could run some more tests and another biliruben, which they did around 10 pm. Asking about the results every time a nurse came in from about 2 am to 3 am, we were finally told around 3:30 that the lab had lost that test and they would need to do another one. Finally got the results at 6 am and were given the go-ahead to feed him after a total of about 12 hours without. They did give him an IV, so he wasn't starving hungry as far as we could tell, but there was a good 6 hours or so where he pretty much cried straight through. Definitely tough for a first-time parent (as it would be for any parent, LDO). Then he slept pretty much straight through except for feedings every 2.5 hours or so.

He went another 12 hours under the bili-lights and got his number down to 11.9 so he went off the lights and we had to wait another 12 hours to make sure it didn't spike up again. Left the hospital after a total of about 45 hours at 12.9 which we were told was good. He was feeding well and pooping well.

Had another follow up appointment today and his score is back up to ~16.9 so he's now back on just the bili-blanket (thankfully at home) which is much more easily manageable, but still frustrating given that we thought we were done with the whole thing. We go back for another test tomorrow.

Still... in the grand scheme of things, there are much worse things that could have been and we're thankful that he's generally healthy (or will be soon). We've been in a pretty good teamwork groove and have gotten some sleep and are coping pretty well all things considered. What doesn't kill us makes us stronger and whatnot...
man icant imagine how this was, I was in very similar situation ,my daughter was born 3 weeks early and had her Blli jump from 10 to 16.4 in one day, thankfully it has leveled off since and is dropping but I cant imagine having to watch her cry and be hungry and not be able to do a thing about it.
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11-25-2009 , 06:22 PM
so the fiance is getting induced this Sunday. Anyone know how long this process usually takes?

Hopefully all goes well, and I'll have some pics to post some time next week.
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11-25-2009 , 07:33 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizardplow
so the fiance is getting induced this Sunday. Anyone know how long this process usually takes?

Hopefully all goes well, and I'll have some pics to post some time next week.
My wife was put on the pit bull at 2pm, we had a little girl at 1:30 am. No clue if 11.5 hours is normal timing or not.
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11-25-2009 , 08:50 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barcalounger
My wife was put on the pit bull at 2pm, we had a little girl at 1:30 am. No clue if 11.5 hours is normal timing or not.
Thanks Barca, I've really got no idea what to expect
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11-26-2009 , 06:24 PM
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