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Do you believe in freewill? Do you believe in freewill?

11-16-2022 , 05:48 PM
"Illusion" might be the wrong word.

"Incorrect interpretation (model?)" might be more correct.
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11-16-2022 , 10:36 PM
Something or other about determinism being a fickle thought experiment wherein introducing an outside authority negates the concept entirely…
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11-16-2022 , 11:04 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by drowkcableps
Something or other about determinism being a fickle thought experiment wherein introducing an outside authority negates the concept entirely…
Which may be interesting to a very deranged few, me atop the list I fear.
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11-16-2022 , 11:06 PM
Not earnest of course. I just tend to see things to their conclusion…. And I post to verify if that conclusion is logical.
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11-16-2022 , 11:13 PM
Is an action determined if an intermediary introduced which prevents that action?

If so what business is it called determined?

Now if we incorporate that intermediary into that system which produced the final action, which was predetermined with the intermediary taken into account….
My drift
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11-16-2022 , 11:14 PM
I can keep going or I could have stopped after my first post… I added nothing since then.. but it’s sterile and I like the taste.
“Patches o hoolahan”
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11-22-2022 , 03:41 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by PairTheBoard
From what I understand, when it comes to quantum indeterminacy they've "proven" there are no "hidden variables". The indeterminacy is inherent and not due to our lack of knowledge. So not subject to revision based on a better understanding in the future. Maybe they're wrong or maybe I misunderstand it. OTOH, maybe that's the way it really is.
What was proven in Bell's 1964 paper is that the hypothesis of hidden variables (which is equivalent to the hypothesis that quantum systems can be modeled using probability theory) is not consistent with the hypothesis of locality. There are interpretations of the mathematics of quantum theory (such as the Bohmian interpretation) which reject locality. These interpretations are deterministic, in the sense that most people understand the word "deterministic".
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11-23-2022 , 10:31 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason1990
What was proven in Bell's 1964 paper is that the hypothesis of hidden variables (which is equivalent to the hypothesis that quantum systems can be modeled using probability theory) is not consistent with the hypothesis of locality. There are interpretations of the mathematics of quantum theory (such as the Bohmian interpretation) which reject locality. These interpretations are deterministic, in the sense that most people understand the word "deterministic".
What you say is entirely true, but I think you are giving short shrift to the implications of non-locality. The whole hidden variables debate arose mainly because many physicists, most prominently Einstein, objected to the notion of inherent randomness in quantum interactions. Hence the idea that such interactions are not really random, but rather are completely determined by aspects of the system that are unaccounted for. These physicists were certainly looking for a way out of randomness, but non-locality almost certainly was not an acceptable way out. In fact, they were more likely to accept randomness than non-local interactions.

Einstein in particular developed his most famous theories based entirely on the notion that all interactions are local — hence the postulate in relatively that no speeds greater than light speed are possible. Non-locality would allow for instantaneous interactions. This is a major deal as it implies that there is no way to consistently order events in time in a way that all observers would agree upon. In a non-local universe it makes no sense physically to say event A happened before event B. Some observers would say A happened first, others would say B happened first, still others would observe them to happen simultaneously.

At a bare minimum, to talk about causation, the cause must precede the effect in temporal sequence. However with non-locality, we cannot actually definitively state that one event precedes another. Thus, we cannot really speak of causation in such a universe. It is hard to say that a universe where cause and effect make no sense is in any way deterministic.
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11-27-2022 , 06:00 AM
We have will, not free will. Nothing is free in that sense and is kind of a red herring. Everything in the universe has trillions of forces working on it ... including people.
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11-27-2022 , 09:30 PM
It seems to be a common claim that Bell proved there are no hidden variables. But neither did he prove this, nor was this what he concluded from his own work. He was, in fact, an advocate of Bohm's interpretation.

There are also misconceptions surrounding the dichotomy that follows from Bell's work. Hidden variables do not prevent randomness. The Bohmian interpretation agrees with all the experimental results of quantum mechanics. Despite the so-called "hidden variables", randomness lives on. It is intrinsic and irremovable, as we know it to be. (If I hide a quantity and make it impossible to discover, then it is intrinsically random.) On the other side of the issue, the kind of nonlocality implied by Bell's work is of a limited nature. One does not need to assume everything is nonlocal.

But the more relevant issue to me is this. Bell assumed hidden variables. This assumption took on a particular mathematical form. To be precise, he assumed we can model the experiment using probability theory. This assumption is what fails if we assume total locality. When we assume locality, we are rejecting probability theory. This fact flies under the radar because physicists don't use rigorous probability. But it is exactly what Bell proved.

Moreover, probability theory is an extension of classical logic. In fact, when we are assuming locality, we are rejecting classical logic. Hence, the need for so-called "quantum logic" and "quantum probability". In science, we combine experiment, mathematics, and interpretation. Sometimes these conspire to present us with a contradiction. In that case, we usually revise either our mathematics or our interpretation. This situation is the only one in which the mainstream response has been to reject logic itself. That is at least as radical, if not more radical, than assuming some limited form of nonlocality.

Regardless of whether Bohm's interpretation is "right", what I find interesting is this. As an interpretation, it agrees with all the mathematics of quantum theory. It agrees with all the experimental results. Every interpretation does, of course. Thus, the parts of other interpretations that are not in Bohm's do not follow from experiment. An example is the notion of wave function collapse. Another is the ill-defined sort of "intrinsic randomness" that is bandied about. These things are not experimental consequences. They are part of an interpretive layer that lies atop everything else.
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11-28-2022 , 11:38 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason1990

But the more relevant issue to me is this. Bell assumed hidden variables. This assumption took on a particular mathematical form. To be precise, he assumed we can model the experiment using probability theory. This assumption is what fails if we assume total locality. When we assume locality, we are rejecting probability theory. This fact flies under the radar because physicists don't use rigorous probability. But it is exactly what Bell proved.

Moreover, probability theory is an extension of classical logic. In fact, when we are assuming locality, we are rejecting classical logic. Hence, the need for so-called "quantum logic" and "quantum probability".
Great to hear from you again. Hope your research has gone well. What a pleasure reading your posts.

This is news to me that mainstream physics has rejected classical logic and probability to accommodate locality and quantum effects. Exactly what do they modify in classical logic to do this. Do they substitute a sliding scale for the law of the excluded middle?

Also, from what I remember the last time we looked at Bohm's model, it's deterministic based on a Universal Schrodinger wave function that depends on unknown initial conditions. Are the unknown initial conditions where the "intrinsic randomness" you mentioned come in? Are those initial conditions just unknown or might they be intrinsically uncertain or even indeterminate?


PairTheBoard
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Yesterday , 05:05 AM
Is it unknown initial conditions when I stagger into a pub and order a ghostship ale?! I think not.

Try discussing something worthwhile. Not esoteric ramblings more suited for the Book of Ecclesiastes.
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Yesterday , 06:53 AM
At 40-45 minutes Chomsky discusses free will. Paraphrasing, he says science explains things either via determinism or stochastic processes (randomness). So if science is complete there is no free will. But if free will involves something other than determinism or stochastic processes then current science can't explain it.




PairTheBoard
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Yesterday , 11:31 AM
^ Pretty obvious: Where there is determinism there is no freedom, and where there is randomness there is no will.
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Yesterday , 06:48 PM
I think there's one more wrinkle per DurkaDurka in our last thread on this topic. That is, if there is free will there would be no way to tell it wasn't random. The problem is underdetermined. Seems to me some people were dubious about this point but DurkaDurka insisted on it as an expert on the philosophical position for libertarian free will.


PairTheBoard
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Today , 12:27 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimM
^ Pretty obvious: Where there is determinism there is no freedom, and where there is randomness there is no will.
Interesting.
Did you feel that you wrote that one post because it was inevitably forced upon you by a strict deterministic process that started 13 billion years ago with the Big Bang, or was it just random writing?
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Today , 01:14 AM
People who wonder if they have free will, have it. On the other hand, people who SAY they wonder about it yet don't realize that it means they have it, may actually not have it and may merely be zombies. So, I am a little scared.
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