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Old 08-13-2012, 01:46 AM   #126
Heyokha
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Quote:
Originally Posted by SenorKeeed View Post
Yes for sure a crock pot can be converted into a sous-vide setup, and it's great for that. A french oven is an enameled dutch oven. A cast iron pan is great because the increasingly excellent nonstick is useful for so many applications. An enameled cast-iron surface is a good nonstick surface, but not as good as well-treated cast iron. But for braising and stewing, the great cast iron surface really isn't necessary. You get a really great heavy cast iron pot without having to care for the cast iron. You can wash it with soap.
I was suggesting you use the crock pot for sous-vide, y'know, because you said you don't use it much. I thought an enameled dutch oven was just called an enameled dutch oven. I may google this a bit if I can't sleep.

Don't forget the enameled coating is non reactive, but it's more likely to crack than regular cast iron.

Last edited by Heyokha; 08-13-2012 at 01:47 AM. Reason: I didn't notice your name change earlier
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Old 08-13-2012, 01:51 AM   #127
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Mom called hers a french oven so that's what I do. But yeah it's an enameled dutch oven.
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Old 08-13-2012, 10:41 AM   #128
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Tried my first sous vide experiment tonight. Chicken breast, came out great, didn't even touch the sauce I'd made for it cause the chicken was so damn good. I'll definitely try more recipes, but I'm wondering about the upper temp limit I want to use.

The setup I'm using is a rice cooker and cheap ziploc bags (I'm in China so quality can be difficult). Recipes I've seen for sous vide veggies have temps in the 180 F range; should I worry about the plastic bag at that kind of temp?
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:31 AM   #129
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

i know they aren't exactly alike, but i don't really touch my slow cooker now i have a le creuset (insert stuff about le creuset being overpriced here)
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:37 AM   #130
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

I was about to say that it's probably fine to spend a lot on something like that since it will last forever. But then I looked at le creuset's web page and WTF a seven and a half quart french oven costs $305?

But I still kind of want one.
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Old 08-13-2012, 12:24 PM   #131
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Guys,

Since we have some beginners in here as well as all the pros, here's a step by step of something I just made again that I've posted before in the steak thread. Cheap, easy, and delicious. You just need to get it started a few hours before you want to eat.

Honey BBQ Oven Short Ribs

Short ribs. I don't remember how much they cost, but they are pretty cheap. This is about 3lbs.


Mix up some spices. The combo in the recipe is pretty good. I like mine a little spicier so I add more cayenne, and I also add more garlic powder. Rub the spices all over the short ribs.


Cover w/ foil and cook at 300 for ~2.5hrs. I prefer them a little meatier tasting, so I go closer to 2 hours. If you like them really soft/fall off the bone, you can go longer. Move the ribs around, flip them over, etc to get them all covered w/ the delicious spicy drippings. Then drizzle honey over the ribs (I sometimes use brown sugar or bbq sauce instead, they all work great). I make sure to get some on the sides as well. Uncover and cook another 15 minutes at 425.
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Old 08-13-2012, 01:40 PM   #132
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

I have too many pictures to post. Will definitely be getting some of my heirloom bruschetta pics up at some point and have tons of old ones to go through.
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Old 08-13-2012, 01:52 PM   #133
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Quote:
Originally Posted by anklebreaker View Post
Technique/recipe is described well in Michael Ruhlman's book "Twenty," which I highly recommend.

http://books.google.com/books?id=IUr...20eggs&f=false
Ruhlman's Twenty is a great, great book. Any cook aspiring to become better should read it, IMO. The first chapter is especially important.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yimyammer View Post
Here's an amazing book I want to buy (its $500 bucks):

Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking
Not that I would know anything about this, but if you search around you may find an incredible PDF scan of all of the volumes, OCRed, straightened out and everything. I would approximately never buy this book series (the home version will be another story), so I don't think it's a lost sale to the authors or anything... if anything it convinced me to jump on the home version once it comes out in October.
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Old 08-13-2012, 05:38 PM   #134
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

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Originally Posted by CheckRaise View Post
Snipe/other sous vide guys

how are you calibrating your thermocouple? do you just stick a calibrated thermapen or w/e meat temp you have in the water to see if the temp on that matches up with the controller?
I actually didn't bother to calibrate. I know that the precision of sous vide is one of it's charms, but if you're going to do things like crust a steak post sous vide, you're accepting some level of 'feel' in the process anyway, and temperature variance beyond 1 or 2 degrees, so I figured my RTD is close enough. I've been pleased with the results thus far.


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Originally Posted by bobman0330 View Post
Man, that PID looks really well-built. I used similar resources, but mine is like 4x as big and looks awful. But it works!

What do you use for sealing? I guess from the vacuum pickle, you have a chamber vac?
I took the plunge and picked up a VP112. I know it's total overkill, but I like nice objects and an only a moderately responsible kidult.

Strangely, however, I noticed yesterday that the garlic that I vacuum sealed last weak, while still sealed, has lost it's vacuum. What I mean by that is that it was a nice, tight package where all the cloves were compressed when I first sealed it, however now there is a noticeable amount of gas in the bag. When I squeeze the bag however, it feels air tight with none of the gas escaping.

Does garlic outgas? Very strange.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeti View Post
i know they aren't exactly alike, but i don't really touch my slow cooker now i have a le creuset (insert stuff about le creuset being overpriced here)
I have a Le Creuset as well, but then again, please see comments above regarding "moderately responsible kidult".

Btw - I believe "French Oven" is simply a marketing term created by Le Creuset to differentiate their product.
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Old 08-13-2012, 06:02 PM   #135
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

When I was first married the wife and I became obsessed with Le Cruset and collected quite a few pieces. They are in great condition after nearly 25 years of moderate use. But now you can buy relatively inexpensive enamel cast iron cookware. I just got a 8 liter French Oven for $60 on sale and it is great. I mean I cant really say there is a difference in the cooking results from this imitation one over my smaller Le Cruset. I love Le Cruset but I think they are really overpriced compared to what you can get for less money these days.

EDIT: Just went to take a photo of my new French Oven and there is a chip out of the enamel on the handle!!!! So maybe not as good as Le Cruset...............

Last edited by Bovvaboy; 08-13-2012 at 06:07 PM.
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Old 08-13-2012, 07:30 PM   #136
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackpot7 View Post
I just got a Vitamix and have been using it to make awesome healthy green smoothies to start the day. What else do people like to make in theirs?

Here's a sample recipe. I mix up the fruit all the time depending on whats in season and looks good
handful of red and regular kale
handful spinach
4-5 baby carrots
cucumber
apple
kiwi
ground flaxseed
hemp oil
I use my vitamix everyday. Here is my standard recipe.

(2 servings)

1 banana
1 avacado
couple handfuls greens (spinach, parsley, kale, etc)
spoon of coconut oil
~2 cups of berries (usually blueberries with whatever else)
~1 cup of water
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Old 08-13-2012, 07:38 PM   #137
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Just a quick grunch after reading the first couple posts. I ****ing love fennel.

I'll try to post some stuff ITT at some point.
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Old 08-13-2012, 07:55 PM   #138
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

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Just a quick grunch after reading the first couple posts. I ****ing love fennel.

I'll try to post some stuff ITT at some point.
Yeah, did some grilled fennel pork chops this weekend. Easiest thing in the world and absolutely delicious. Then got hungry last night, had some pork tenderloin hanging around, and pan fried up some fennel rubbed tenderloin.

Really, this fennel rub has quickly become my favorite way to do pork, and it's simple beyond belief.

I'll probably cut the salt by 1/3 - 1/2 for pork chops or pan fried tenderloin, however, depending on your taste for salt. I used as is at the BBQ, and while everyone loved the chops (the crust was amazing - it's been a while since I grilled chops and was very pleased) - I thought it was flavorful, but a bit salty.
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Old 08-13-2012, 08:04 PM   #139
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

**** you and your delicious ****ing short ribs el d

now I'll be thinking of them while I eat this pork loin I'll ruin

Last edited by grando1.0; 08-13-2012 at 08:05 PM. Reason: and while i'm ****ing my gf...and...well till I forget about them
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Old 08-13-2012, 08:13 PM   #140
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

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Originally Posted by grando1.0 View Post
**** you and your delicious ****ing short ribs el d

now I'll be thinking of them while I eat this pork loin I'll ruin
Give fennel crusted pork loin medallions a shot. They're easy and delicious.
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Old 08-13-2012, 10:59 PM   #141
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Quote:
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Give fennel crusted pork loin medallions a shot. They're easy and delicious.
Yes, I make a crusted pork loin pretty frequently. I usually improvise a rub out of salt, pepper, fennel, red pepper flake, cumin, paprika and a tiny amount of cinnamon. The cinnamon is subtle but it adds a nice twist.

Sometimes I'll throw in some garlic powder and other random things too.

Sear the loin in oil, finish in oven, cut into medallions. om nom nom
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:06 PM   #142
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Do any of you cook with asafoetida?

Looking to experiment with the devil's dung.

ETA: Also called hing. Roy?

Last edited by crashjr; 08-13-2012 at 11:12 PM.
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:43 PM   #143
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

I'd never even heard of it until your post o_0
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Old 08-14-2012, 12:24 AM   #144
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

oh man, i just made some delicious stuffed chicken breasts with a delicious and simple tomato sauce tonight. posting this so i remember to post the recipe later
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Old 08-14-2012, 12:29 AM   #145
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Quote:
Originally Posted by rsxpunk View Post
I use my vitamix everyday. Here is my standard recipe.

(2 servings)

1 banana
1 avacado
couple handfuls greens (spinach, parsley, kale, etc)
spoon of coconut oil
~2 cups of berries (usually blueberries with whatever else)
~1 cup of water
noob question, are smoothies made like this different than say bolthouse farms smoothies? i went through a phase about 6 months ago of wanting to add smoothies to my diet and tried to drink a bolthouse farm smoothie (tried a few different ones) in the morning or at lunch and it seemed like i couldn't digest them properly (ie. had to run to bathroom for emergencies multiple times a day after drinking one).


i dont normally eat fruits so maybe it just takes a few weeks/months of getting used to? i gave up on my smoothie experiment after 2 weeks :/
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Old 08-14-2012, 01:15 PM   #146
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else



tuna steak, spicy tomato sauce, couscous, salad
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Old 08-14-2012, 01:22 PM   #147
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Looks nice, I love couscous, salad and tomato sauce but I can never do tuna steak without it tasting (how do i say this without looking too stupid) too fishy.

Kudos
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Old 08-14-2012, 04:46 PM   #148
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re: Cooking a Good Everything Else

Quote:
Originally Posted by yimyammer View Post
I'm in charge of all the charcuterie (here's a great book we use: Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing. I'll try to write up a post down the road on some of the stuff I get to do, I've got some stuff curing that wont be ready for another month or so that I think you folks might find pretty cool (pepperoni, chorizo, coppa & Bresaola).
Awesome, can't wait to read more about this - I also just ordered the book. I've taken a few basic butchery and meat preservation classes but so far have only done terrines and confit (just ate my duck confit that had been sitting for ~3 months this past week, it was divine).

I just moved into a house from an apartment and actually think I can create a storage medium for curing, so I'm getting geared up. I am a little bit afraid of killing old people with botulism though and would love tips/suggestions.
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Old 08-14-2012, 05:41 PM   #149
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I have some saffron threads that I was going to use in a recipe that I don't remember and never ended up making. Stuff is ridic expensive. Any ideas For a reasonably easy recipe that uses saffron?

I just don't want to waste an expensive ingredient on some recipe I can't taste it.
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Old 08-14-2012, 06:06 PM   #150
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Indian or middle eastern cooking. Tagine perhaps? you can usually taste it in rice or rice dishes (pilaf, pilau, kabsa, biryani etc) perhaps?
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