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Old 03-26-2011, 04:02 AM   #176
GiantWalleye
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlmightyGod View Post
He claimed he quit poker a year ago - April 29th, 2010.

Perhaps losing 80bi at nl100 was the reason

So the story goes:
pwned

Last edited by GiantWalleye; 03-26-2011 at 04:03 AM. Reason: in before op dissapears for a while
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Old 03-26-2011, 04:15 AM   #177
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by browser2920 View Post
I guess some people have no clue what it means to work fulltime at something. One guy said he wants to turn poker into a hobby again after working at it a whole 1100 hours total over two years. Guess what--that already IS a hobby. 50 weeks (if you're lucky enough to get 2 weeks vacation) times 40 hours is 2000 hours a year for a fulltime job. So 1100 hours over 2 years is barely a part time job. Another poster claimed to make unlimited money in 4 hours a week, but was burned out because he had to "think about poker" during the rest of the week. Get real.

For those who say there is more to life than money, that is certainly true in many respects. But in real life, the only people who say that are those whose income level already exceeds the expenses of their basic needs. If you are like the vast majority of working people that struggle to simply pay for rent and to clothe and feed the kids, then money is very important. When you don't have enough money to meet basic expenses, the struggle for money and the stress generated by the potential consequences dominates your life. Sure, Tiger Woods doesn't play the game for money, he wants titles; but the single mom working at Walmart during the day and waiting tables at night so she can feed her kids does it for the money, not the self satisfaction.

I think some people posting here should go read some business books about executive life. The struggle for balance in life sure didn't start with the poker boom. Any successful executive or business owner puts in more like 50-70 hours a week into their profession or business, not 9-5. See how much life balance you get when you leave for work at 6am, get home at 9pm and work weekends to get ready for the upcoming week. See how much time you have to exercise, eat right, and go watch the kids play little league. It's amazing to me that some think that those balance issues are somehow tied to poker, when playing poker for a living allows way more flexibility than most jobs or careers.

Now, if you are one of those people who can't get your ass out the door to do social things, or don't have any other interests, then guess what? Getting a "real job" won't change that. That's a personal characteristic that is independent of the fact that you play poker. You may have some fantasy vision of going to an office and then going out after work with the pals. But in real life, most people work late, then face a soul crushing commute to get home and try and squeeze in a few moments with the family. They won't be available to go out socializing with you. Working 40 hours or more a week is a bit tougher than having 15 hours of class a week at college.

Almost all white collar jobs today revolve around staring at a screen all day long. Just look at the Dilbert cartoons about life in a office cubical. It's true that some people find their passion and pursuit it. But for every one of those, there is probably a hundred who found a job and took it to make a living. But the point is you have a job to make a living, not a LIFE. What kind of life you live is up to you.

For those of you who think that the working world is some magical escape from boredom, repetitiveness and the mundane, sorry to pop that bubble. I got a kick out of the poster who said that having 2 ****ty jobs in one year qualified him to speak to what a grind it is. Right. He wasn't even at either job long enough to really feel what a grind is.

Sorry, didn't mean to rant. But I just feel that some of these posters, particularly those who are young and started with poker and haven't been in the "real world" so to speak, don't appreciate how hard it is to make good money, how much work is involved, and how many personal sacrifices people make to get ahead "out there". Whether anyone decides to play poker for a living for a year, a decade or a lifetime is up to them. But don't be fooled by the grass is greener in the real working world illusion. It's just like all pro athletes want to be rock stars, and all rock stars want to be athletes. It's always greener on the other side.
One of the best posts I've read on here
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Old 03-26-2011, 04:16 AM   #178
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

OP obviously quit posting his screen name and graphs when he "quit" poker.
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Old 03-26-2011, 05:44 AM   #179
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlmightyGod View Post
He claimed he quit poker a year ago - April 29th, 2010.

Perhaps losing 80bi at nl100 was the reason

So the story goes:


OP^^^
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Old 03-26-2011, 06:44 AM   #180
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by ObsidianOrder View Post
Some great posts ITT.

I don't get why people view this in such binary terms, i.e. play poker professionally OR work a job. Why not do both and/or set up your own business / income streams? Trick for me to a happy, healthy life is having multiple income streams and minimising dependence on any one.

I haven't played a ton, maybe 1m hands lifetime, but 20+ buy in downswings have affected me in very negative ways in the past because I was relying on poker for a living at the time. It now seems crazy to me to put all your eggs in one basket when you have no control over your actual winnings unless massively rolled.

Also setting up your own businesses rocks.
Very true. This is logical even from a poker point of view.

Dont put your eggs all in one income basket (i.e. if poker fails you have no other income and are unemployable).

It is kinda the same prinicple as not grinding a level as a pro till you have 75bi minimum.
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Old 03-26-2011, 06:49 AM   #181
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by Little Lebowski View Post
I guess it all depends on your personallity if you want a normal job or if you can enjoy your current life as a pro.

People are always glamorizing the other alternative.

Keep in mind that a lot of qualified office jobs that seems interesting in the beginning are really boring and repetetive after a while. They break down your creative spirit. The concept with a fixed place to be at every weekday at certain hours and do similar tasks is really frustrating for some people, and really rewarding for others.

It's easy to believe that a normal job is gonna be fun, and that your colleagues will be great people that'll be your friends, and that your boss will treat you fair and give you a nice bonus at the end of the year. It might happen, and it might not.
And when a job becomes boring you can move on and get another job.

If you play poker for 3 years and then decide you want to move on you cant. Basically you will have reduced your employability to such a level that it will be hard to move on.

Also, when your job is sucking you still get that pay check every month. And what of poker? when poker is sucking you are probably losing 5% your net worth over that peroid.
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Old 03-26-2011, 06:51 AM   #182
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by David123 View Post
browser2920 with a excellent post itt(see Quote above). Agree with everything.

Balance has to be created by oneself, it's not something that magically appears with the right job/income source. It sure is easy to blame "poker" but its not poker that makes u play 24/7, that's a personal choice.
True, but the points stake monster raised show why it is VERY VERY difficult to do this within poker.

The best way to play poker is probably semi pro with a 1-3 day a week regular job. Then you can get a bit of extra pocket money but you arent screwing your resume by just being a proffesional gambler for 4 years and getting no references or experience.
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Old 03-26-2011, 06:56 AM   #183
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by AlmightyGod View Post
He claimed he quit poker a year ago - April 29th, 2010.

Perhaps losing 80bi at nl100 was the reason

So the story goes:
I did quit in April - hardly played since. Not played at all last 4 months. Maybe done 50k hands since the quit. I just came back here to report quitting was a great thing to do.
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Old 03-26-2011, 07:02 AM   #184
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

Another completely pointless thread because it disregards that people aren't all the same.

We all have different ideas about the perfect job. Me, I want a job where I meet a lot of people; I couldn't stand having a job in an office where I meet the same 20 people 9 hours a day, every day, every week, every year.

But others might have no problem with that, and again others might even consider being all alone in front of the computer for 9 hours a nice job.

Of course there are some people who have no social life anymore because after grinding for hours at the computer, they are too lazy to go out and meet with friends.
But others do just that, and for them online poker is a good job.
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Old 03-26-2011, 07:27 AM   #185
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by BartJ385 View Post
Another completely pointless thread because it disregards that people aren't all the same.

We all have different ideas about the perfect job. Me, I want a job where I meet a lot of people; I couldn't stand having a job in an office where I meet the same 20 people 9 hours a day, every day, every week, every year.

But others might have no problem with that, and again others might even consider being all alone in front of the computer for 9 hours a nice job.

Of course there are some people who have no social life anymore because after grinding for hours at the computer, they are too lazy to go out and meet with friends.
But others do just that, and for them online poker is a good job.
Have you played poker for a living for over 2 years?
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Old 03-26-2011, 07:35 AM   #186
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by BobBlank View Post
Have you played poker for a living for over 2 years?
My post says explicitly that playing poker for a living would be a horrible job for me, so guess what - the answer is 'no'.
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Old 03-26-2011, 07:51 AM   #187
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by BobBlank View Post
True, but the points stake monster raised show why it is VERY VERY difficult to do this within poker.

The best way to play poker is probably semi pro with a 1-3 day a week regular job. Then you can get a bit of extra pocket money but you arent screwing your resume by just being a proffesional gambler for 4 years and getting no references or experience.
http://articles.latimes.com/2010/may...aders-20100516
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Old 03-26-2011, 07:59 AM   #188
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by SayGN View Post
I have played for a living over the past two years as well and I am trying desperately to get out. I have not made nearly as much as you, but I made more than enough to live the lifestyle I wanted and accumulate a bit of savings. I worked about 1,100 hours total in the past two years and I cannot wait to turn poker back into a hobby.

It is not surprising that most the negative replies in this thread are coming from people who have no experience playing for a living. For them there is no obligation to play; poker exists as a hobby. It is fun. It takes a rare individual in deed to play full time for several years and still find the game enjoyable.

It is not until you experience the realization that the ONLY reason you play is because you have to in order to survive, are you in a position to comment on the validity of OP's viewpoints. As a recreational player, the appeal to poker is the hopes and dreams of the immense wealth that getting good enough can provide. When you go pro (assuming you do so responsibly) you need to have a more realistic approach to the game and it turns into a job.

The freedom is great if you use it wisely, but it can also be a curse. For those of you who lead a life structured around your 9-5, you probably have no experience in maintaining a healthy lifestyle without that structure. It's really ****ing hard to do. Without knowing how you will respond in an unstructured environment, you are not really in a position to comment on his decision.

I held two really ****ty jobs for a year after graduating from college before going pro. I have some perspective on the workforce and how big of a grind it is. That being said, I am looking forward to rejoining it simply because of how much poker has taken from me as a person. Perhaps that is my fault for letting it happen, but I can confidently say that it will happen to most players who successfully play internet poker for a living. I would argue that it takes FAR more discipline to live a healthy and productive lifestyle as a poker pro than it does to actually be good enough to go pro in the first place. Most people commenting probably do not have the discipline to play cards on a professional level. If you don't have the discipline to play professionally, you probably wouldn't be able to take good care of yourself without the structure that a 9-5 brings, and poker would negatively impact your life as well.

Congrats, OP. Best of luck.
Incredible post. 100% real.
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Old 03-26-2011, 09:42 AM   #189
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by BobBlank View Post
And when a job becomes boring you can move on and get another job.

If you play poker for 3 years and then decide you want to move on you cant. Basically you will have reduced your employability to such a level that it will be hard to move on.

Also, when your job is sucking you still get that pay check every month. And what of poker? when poker is sucking you are probably losing 5% your net worth over that peroid.
With all the money you have left from poker you can always get into day trading. Oh, Wait...
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Old 03-26-2011, 09:54 AM   #190
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

Very good posts by browser, GreenMonster and the detective (sorry brah forgot your sn)
who busted OP.

OP -> "If you play poker for 3 years and then decide you want to move on you cant. Basically you will have reduced your employability to such a level that it will be hard to move on"

This means you don't know how to put poker on your resume in a good light. Try the BFI forums, there's a lot of talk about this, and if you've been quite successful in poker (esp if you've made 100k+), this gets a lot of interest, especially in financial institutions, where risk management is strongly appreciated.
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Old 03-26-2011, 10:58 AM   #191
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by BobBlank View Post
Whether you believe me or not is irrelevent to the point of this thread though.
No it's not.

It could make your whole post irrelevant. Because most people would understand if you quit playing poker after making let's say 60k/year. Nobody understands somebody leaving poker while consistently making 20k/month.

It also makes you less credible/believeable. If you really left the poker world behind. Why would you even bother disclosing your sn/graph? If you can not be completely open. What is the rest of your story worth? (Not much.)

All in all it may turn your whole thread from a real experience into a theoretical discussion. ("Well if I were Phil Ivey then bla bla bla ... ")

Fwiw

If you play poker only because of the money. You'll end up hating the grind at some point. That's inevitable. But that will happen to you in ANY job. Poker ist not different.
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Old 03-26-2011, 11:13 AM   #192
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

FWIW, I've known of OP for 2 or 3 years, played with him a bit a while back.

99% sure he has made $500k or there abouts, dunno why it is so difficult for people to believe him. Sick work ethic when he gets grinding but as people have said this is probably his downfall as well because it means that he dosen't balance other areas of his life. Just IMO, don't know him that well, using my own experiences here as well.

It is ****ing tough. I wouldn't want to be doing this for the rest of my life.
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Old 03-26-2011, 11:31 AM   #193
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

Being a professional poker player is simply making the same choice as millions of others have, which is to decide to go into business for yourself rather than decide to work for someone else. The risks are greater, and so are the potential rewards. All the downsides of being a poker pro that have been mentioned in other posts are true and real, but are no different than thousands of other businesses that people start.

Below is a little fictional interview I made up to illustrate the issues involved. But I used professional tennis player instead of professional poker player. This helps look at the issue without the bias many have about poker. So just read the interview, and then substitute "poker" for "tennis".


So you've been a professional tennis player for 3 years now. That's an unusual field. How did you get into it?

---Well, I played tennis in college and was very good at it and enjoyed it, and thought I would try and make a living out of playing tennis.

How did it go?

---pretty well. I haven't won any big tournaments yet, but I've placed highly regularly and make what could be considered very good money for someone in their early 20's.

What did your parents think about you becoming a tennis pro?

---they didn't like it much. they said "what if you don't make enough money?" and "why don't you get a steady job that will pay you a regular salary? What if you get hurt, what will you do?" "You could still play tennis on the weekends." "It just all seems so risky."

Those seem like good points. So why did you do it?

---I just really enjoyed it, thought I was good at it and wanted to give it a try. I know that thousands of recreational tennis players dream about doing it for a living, but I really thought I had the skill and work ethic to make it. I know there were risks involved, but everything involves risks. But you can't succeed as a pro part time. You have to commit to putting in the long hours it takes to succeed against the other pro players. So I knew I would have to "take the plunge" and go for it.

That didn't scare you?

---Sure it did. But ask any wealthy entrepreneur about foregoing a "safe" job to start their own business and follow their passion and you'll probably get the same answer. Some people want the security of a regular 9-5 job, and are willing to accept that they will probably never become wealthy from it or may not have a particular passion for it. That's fine, and their choice. Of course, security is relative, as if the business they work for starts to lose money, their job will go away too. Others like the feeling of having their professional life in their own hands, and believe that their own skill and hard work will lead them to succeed and reap the rewards. It's just a choice people make. I made the choice to play tennis.

So has it turned out like you thought?

---well, the lifestyle is very difficult. It may look glamorous on TV, but you don't really make good friends with other tennis players because you are always trying to beat them and win the money. Plus, there isn't much time for socializing because to win, you have to train and practice constantly. It's strange in a way because you are always around people, yet it can be a very lonely lifestyle. It seems my whole life revolves around the tennis court. To be honest, there are many days when the last thing I want to do is drag my butt onto the tennis court, or into the weight room. But if you want to succeed, you do it anyway. It's very hard work, but I enjoy it tremendously. And while the money is good when you are playing good, sometimes you go through periods where you don't get very far in the tournament and so you don't make any money. Sure the very biggest stars make endorsement money, but for the rest of us it's a weekly grind. This takes its toll mentally. So it's been even more difficult than I thought, but I must admit I love it and am very glad with my choice.

Have you thought about what you would do if you couldn't play tennis anymore?

---well everyone knows that most tennis players have a relatively short career. And I guess "professional tennis player" wouldn't seem like much on a resume. What skills would an employer think you have besides hitting a little yellow ball back and forth. But I feel like the discipline, work ethic and mental toughness I developed to succeed on tour will serve me well in the future. Think of how many professional athletes play for a few years and then go into successful careers in completely unrelated fields. It's because if you are smart, work hard and apply yourself you can succeed in many areas. That's just the way life works. No one hands you anything just because you walk in the door. You still have to make things happen. Besides, no one really knows what they'll be doing in 5, 10 or 20 years from now.

OK then. I think most people would be surprised to learn how hard it is to be a successful tennis player, but you certainly seem to enjoy it. Best of luck.

----thanks.

Last edited by browser2920; 03-26-2011 at 11:37 AM.
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Old 03-26-2011, 11:40 AM   #194
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by browser2920 View Post
Being a professional poker player is simply making the same choice as millions of others have, which is to decide to go into business for yourself rather than decide to work for someone else. The risks are greater, and so are the potential rewards. All the downsides of being a poker pro that have been mentioned in other posts are true and real, but are no different than thousands of other businesses that people start.
Except for the resume part.
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Old 03-26-2011, 12:03 PM   #195
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

Most jobs are a grind, especially office jobs, and OP is making stuff up.
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Old 03-26-2011, 12:10 PM   #196
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

tl;dr. Was there a graph? If not, then thread sucks.
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Old 03-26-2011, 12:14 PM   #197
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by BobBlank View Post
I did quit in April - hardly played since.
So you quit in April of 2010 correct? If that's the case then the profits you claim to have made are off. In this post made in April 2010, you said "This isnt a results dependent decision as i made $250k last year (tax free where i live) and even made $28k in the last month." You made 250k in 2009 and 28k in March 2010. Your OP in this thread states "I quit after making $500k in 2.5 years playing cash games for a living."

If you quit back in April 2010, then how did you make $500k in the past 2.5 years? You're off by a swell $222k. You also seem to allude that you haven't been employed since you quit here and here. But you have been employed (most likely full time) since you quit however.

You're mental. Post a graph and your screen name and I'll stfu.

Last edited by AlmightyGod; 03-26-2011 at 12:23 PM.
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Old 03-26-2011, 12:21 PM   #198
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by AlmightyGod View Post
So you quit in April of 2010 correct? If that's the case then the profits you claim to have made are off. In this post made in April 2010, you said "This isnt a results dependent decision as i made $250k last year (tax free where i live) and even made $28k in the last month." You made 250k in 2009 and 28k in February 2010. Your OP in this thread states "I quit after making $500k in 2.5 years playing cash games for a living."

If you quit back in April 2010, then how did you make $500k in the past 2.5 years? You're off by a swell $222k.
simple: 2.5 years =/= last 2.5 years. Maybe OP is full of ****, but you need to learn to read.
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Old 03-26-2011, 12:42 PM   #199
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by AlmightyGod View Post
So you quit in April of 2010 correct? If that's the case then the profits you claim to have made are off. In this post made in April 2010, you said "This isnt a results dependent decision as i made $250k last year (tax free where i live) and even made $28k in the last month." You made 250k in 2009 and 28k in March 2010. Your OP in this thread states "I quit after making $500k in 2.5 years playing cash games for a living."

If you quit back in April 2010, then how did you make $500k in the past 2.5 years? You're off by a swell $222k. You also seem to allude that you haven't been employed since you quit here and here. But you have been employed (most likely full time) since you quit however.

You're mental. Post a graph and your screen name and I'll stfu.
Maths fail here.

Make $50k start of 2010
Make $250k 2009
Make $200k 2008

These are rough estimates

This is 2.5 yrs. Congrats on the epic maths fail.
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Old 03-26-2011, 12:54 PM   #200
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Re: Quitting poker for a living was the best decision I ever made

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Originally Posted by As2s3s4s5s View Post
and often you even get people that have no teeth.
god i hope i keep my teeth!
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