Two Plus Two Publishing LLC
Two Plus Two Publishing LLC
 

Go Back   Two Plus Two Poker Forums > >

Notices

News, Views, and Gossip For poker news, views, and gossip

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-03-2019, 06:59 PM   #351
mrmr
grinder
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 662
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

I am late 30s / early 40s with a family of 5 and a good job, and although my wife confesses she is glad I have poker as a backup in case I were to lose my job, and even though I have day dreamed about it for 15 years now, there are a couple of things that keep me from pulling the trigger and trying to be a full time poker player.

This wasn't true in my 20s, but now, for sure, 100%, if the only game in town has a bunch of annoying people in it, I will just get up and go home. I don't need it. I'd like to play poker, but not if I have to listen to a bunch of pricks talk about their jerky politics or give people stupid advice or tell stupid stories or horrible jokes. I'm not the easiest person to get along with, I am picky about who I like, and have some unusual tastes. That that is definitely my problem, not society's problem, and may not apply to you. It does apply to me, though, so even if I am civil and totally keep my thoughts to myself, I will definitely be quietly hating the moron talking about whatever voodoo quack medical treatment they are using (that is making them feel just great!), or idiots explaining that they aren't superstitious, they just adhere to superstitious belief/practice x, y, and z... I will get very tired very quickly of the very old very conservative crowd making eye contact with each other over their glasses if I talk about anything the least bit optimistic about the future. I will not enjoy hearing the gossip from the lives of the scumbags and drugged out losers who sometimes like to share. I know poker rooms are no smoking these days, but I don't want to have to sit between two people who smell like ashtrays after every smoke break. If I have a headache, like you sometimes get after hours at the table if you don't feel like going to take a meal break or eating mediocre food at the table with dirty chip fingers (a fixable mistake, granted), every single damn time someone slams their chips down, or hammers a check onto the table with their fist, it will drive into your brain like spike. A spike covered in farts and stupid people.

If I were playing to pay the bills, I guess I'd have to suck it up, day in and day out, and sit through that crap. That just scares me.

The other big reason is I am just not convinced I have the discipline to play smart all the time, or to not blow off steam spending money I shouldn't be, that I would have 0 temptation to do if I was at home or the PTA meeting or my 9-5 job, etc.

So I play strictly casually, for fun, and an afford to lose, or to leave at any time. Even when I was in a higher stakes game and able to make 5 figures only playing one session every week or two, it still really wasn't tempting.

Now, if I hadn't gone to college, and didn't have an easy job that lets me work from home and not put in a ton of hours, etc., maybe things would be different... I guess there are a lot of variables.
mrmr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 07:16 PM   #352
Starks Pizzeria
journeyman
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 334
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTyman9 View Post
Don't think they are trying to say they know your market better than you. Just think they are highlighting the fact that nothing is actually guaranteed. It's definitely possible that whatever your market is is actually very likely to be steady, I have no way of knowing, but it's probably still far from a guarantee to be making 150k+ year in year out forever. Almost nothing is actually ever guaranteed to continue on the way it has in life. Which is why it's important no matter what your line of work is to save money and live in a sustainable way. Self employed work like yours or poker it's good to be especially cognizant of this since it can be easy to have a result over a period of time that is significantly over expectation and it can be tempting to overspend, and then when things fall back to earth we've now put ourselves into a bad situation.
solid post i definitely understand what you're saying. Here in Philly if you didnt get in years ago you are basically too late. Its just funny how people talk low interest rates like that's a good thing. Its a seller's market today that's for sure.
Starks Pizzeria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2019, 09:14 PM   #353
adam levine
old hand
 
adam levine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Gone
Posts: 1,304
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

I think a lot of posters itt need to read Fooled by Randomness.
adam levine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 12:53 AM   #354
cannabusto
Pooh-Bah
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,522
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

If you didn't get in years ago, it's too late.

No variance in traditional careers tho.
cannabusto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 01:05 AM   #355
Lilu7
Made 2+2 Great Again
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,828
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTyman9 View Post
the love you have for poker will die down after you start playing professionally. that being said the freedom is great obv. poker economy is going downhill though so imo not really a great time to be leaving a decent job to play poker.
Bolded isnt true for everybody. I'm going on 3 years playing for a living and I still absolutely love the game and get stoked waking up to play. Friend of mine whos been playing 12+ years still loves poker and studies is fun for him to this day. 50/50 online and live overall but more live this last year.

I've never been happier in my life! Just my 2 cents.

Happy new years amigos
Lilu7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 01:21 AM   #356
Lilu7
Made 2+2 Great Again
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,828
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kobeizdabest View Post
If you want to do it and you have the work ethic, then go for it. Don't listen to anyone telling you what to do with your life.
+1000
Lilu7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 02:02 AM   #357
TheTyman9
Pooh-Bah
 
TheTyman9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: gym? you betcha...
Posts: 4,077
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilu7 View Post
Bolded isnt true for everybody. I'm going on 3 years playing for a living and I still absolutely love the game and get stoked waking up to play. Friend of mine whos been playing 12+ years still loves poker and studies is fun for him to this day. 50/50 online and live overall but more live this last year.

I've never been happier in my life! Just my 2 cents.

Happy new years amigos
Can never say anything in absolutes, but it seems fair based both on personal experience as well as the experiences of many others that the vast majority lose passion for the game over time. And this isn't just an issue with poker players, it's an issue in pretty much every line of work. After awhile of doing the same types of things it usually starts to get stale for people. Pro athletes who obviously love their sport also many times tire of it over time.

Three years isn't a super long time tbh but maybe you will continue to have that fire and love for the game a decade from now. If your friend truly still loves poker as much as he did when he first started than I'm happy for him. Unfortunately he's definitely an outlier.

All that being said, grass isn't always greener. As mentioned above, it's not just poker that will grow stale over time. And there's definitely things you can do to not burn out as much. Having a good work/life balance, playing with a proper bankroll so the swings don't stress you out as much, taking advantage of the positives poker brings like flexibility of taking a day/week/month off if you really need to, etc.
TheTyman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 03:09 AM   #358
Lilu7
Made 2+2 Great Again
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,828
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheTyman9 View Post
Can never say anything in absolutes, but it seems fair based both on personal experience as well as the experiences of many others that the vast majority lose passion for the game over time. And this isn't just an issue with poker players, it's an issue in pretty much every line of work. After awhile of doing the same types of things it usually starts to get stale for people. Pro athletes who obviously love their sport also many times tire of it over time.

Three years isn't a super long time tbh but maybe you will continue to have that fire and love for the game a decade from now. If your friend truly still loves poker as much as he did when he first started than I'm happy for him. Unfortunately he's definitely an outlier.

All that being said, grass isn't always greener. As mentioned above, it's not just poker that will grow stale over time. And there's definitely things you can do to not burn out as much. Having a good work/life balance, playing with a proper bankroll so the swings don't stress you out as much, taking advantage of the positives poker brings like flexibility of taking a day/week/month off if you really need to, etc.
Well that's the thing, he or anybody doing it for a living doesnt have to love poker as much as when they very first started, they just have to love/enjoy/like playing poker more than the alternative. Obv few are gonna have the same joy year 5 of doing something near daily as the first time they were exposed. I myself am no exception. But I still enjoy it overall. It's hard to imagine ever reaching the point where going to casino and shooting the **** and playing cards is gonna be less enjoyable than rotting in front of a computer in an office in Corp America. Not to mention with my Berkeley quantitative degree I was only able to make a fraction of what I do now

I also avg 30-35 hours a week with studying included and def have a balance life that includes traveling a ton. Cant speak for anyone else but these have been my best years and I love every minute
Lilu7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 04:33 AM   #359
TheTyman9
Pooh-Bah
 
TheTyman9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: gym? you betcha...
Posts: 4,077
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilu7 View Post
Well that's the thing, he or anybody doing it for a living doesnt have to love poker as much as when they very first started, they just have to love/enjoy/like playing poker more than the alternative. Obv few are gonna have the same joy year 5 of doing something near daily as the first time they were exposed. I myself am no exception. But I still enjoy it overall. It's hard to imagine ever reaching the point where going to casino and shooting the **** and playing cards is gonna be less enjoyable than rotting in front of a computer in an office in Corp America. Not to mention with my Berkeley quantitative degree I was only able to make a fraction of what I do now

I also avg 30-35 hours a week with studying included and def have a balance life that includes traveling a ton. Cant speak for anyone else but these have been my best years and I love every minute
I mostly agree with your thoughts. I think going through constant variance and swings all the time will weigh on anyone though after enough time. It's mentally draining and a very different type of stress than you'll face in most jobs. I also think unless you are making enough to save up a lot of money that poker as a profession will end poorly for most long term. The great part of life is though that we each get to make that decision for ourselves, decide what we value, weigh the pros and cons, and live with the results.

I'm surprised you are making more in poker than with what sounds like a good degree from a good school though. Is this factoring in self employment taxes and lack of benefits? It also needs to be considered what the long term picture is like. Poker prob doesn't have that great of a long term future. Even with live poker game availability just isn't what it used to be and rake goes up over time as well. I'd be surprised if the corporate job path doesn't have a higher financial ev for you. But I wouldn't be surprised if poker has a higher happiness ev to the point it would make sense to make a bit less money over your life as long as you are still able to save enough to do the things you want.

tldr; ultimately both options have their positives and negatives
TheTyman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 06:11 AM   #360
Kilowatt
enthusiast
 
Kilowatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 843
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Getting close to 50 and still doing it.

Mostly online, though.
Kilowatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 07:08 AM   #361
JohnnyDough
newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: BWI
Posts: 31
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kilowatt View Post
Getting close to 50 and still doing it.

Mostly online, though.
What are the best sites to grind online in the US these days?
JohnnyDough is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 09:11 AM   #362
Black Jesuz
enthusiast
 
Black Jesuz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 61
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

I usually play Black Chip Poker (ACR), Bovada, BetOnline and Carbon sometimes.
Black Jesuz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 09:35 AM   #363
BDHarrison
veteran
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 3,068
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by max85 View Post
The issue is I donít enjoy it and it actually causes bad headaches from stress
I play poker and the stress causes high blood pressure, which I've actually tracked to be higher after long weekend sessions, and stress-triggered diarrhea. I enjoy poker, but the lifestyle is not good for my body.
BDHarrison is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 12:30 PM   #364
genghiskan
centurion
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 194
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lilu7 View Post
I'm going on 3 years playing for a living and I still absolutely love the game and get stoked waking up to play. 50/50 online and live overall but more live this last year.
For me, this is the key. Playing online AND live. When I played solely online, I got burned out fairly quickly. Had a tough time putting in 100 hours a month. Then when I started playing solely Live, I also got burned out after a couple of years.

Since I started playing online again a couple of years ago, I've found the perfect balance. I can't play 8 hours of poker a day in either format alone but I really enjoy playing 4 hours of each format a day. My winrate at live has seen a significant improvement as a result and I've been able to maintain a total monthly volume of 140-150 hours without much effort.
genghiskan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 12:35 PM   #365
Pinkmann
adept
 
Pinkmann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 959
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by genghiskan View Post
I've been able to maintain a total monthly volume of 140-150 hours without much effort.
Thats pretty sweet. Ive always wanted to do this but physically going to the casino is such an effort (15 minutes by pub transport).

Do you just play mornings online and live at night?
Pinkmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2019, 12:36 PM   #366
genghiskan
centurion
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 194
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

No, I have a family so it's the opposite. I play mornings live and online at night.
genghiskan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 02:50 PM   #367
DivineGlory
journeyman
 
DivineGlory's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: SICK DEAD poker forum
Posts: 357
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by zachvac View Post
Great thread, great variety of experiences/opinions. I'm only 29 but I played pro full-time from 2008 to 2013, or 19 to 24. At the time my motivations were money and freedom, and to 19 year old me I had a ton of both. Looking back the freedom was the biggest positive. I was able to travel/live in 15+ different countries and have some pretty amazing life experiences very few people my age (even now) have ever had. As for money though, I work now full-time as a data scientist. The money from poker was good but people underestimate how much money you can make in other jobs if you're the type of person who can succeed at poker. I just finished my 4th full year at my 9-to-5 and including retirement contributions+benefits I'm going to clear 150k. If I had skipped the poker and finished school+got a job right out of school I'd almost definitely be in the 200-250k range. This is right around where other people I went to high school with are that went into a similar field. Now I'm not saying that's easy to do, but I think most people good enough to come close to 6 figures in poker in 2018 could do it.

In addition, the work is far less stressful. Don't get me wrong, stress and variance still exists (lol at a real job having no variance), but it's naturally a lot lower with less built in randomness and working for someone else has the benefit of them eating some of the remaining variance. And people talk about all the freedom poker gives you, but for everyone in this thread who used their poker winnings to travel and go on trips there are another 100 poker pros who didn't leave their hometown or who "traveled" but never left the casino of whatever city the poker tournament they went to was. And you can also travel with a 9-to-5. I now get 25 vacation days per year (in addition to the company-wide 10 holidays) and can work remotely as long as it's not a regular occurrence. I generally do 1-2 international trips per year, which isn't as much as I traveled playing poker but I also don't have to "work" during my trips at all.

Anyway there's obviously downsides to a 9-to-5 as well. In poker I loved nothing better than someone being an arrogant idiot and being like "well now I get to take your money". In a corporate environment, oftentimes that arrogant idiot is a VP making millions per year who you need to impress in order for your career to advance, and oftentimes that VP will then use your work in order to advance their own career. And I certainly don't mean to downplay the positives of poker. I made so many friends and so many memories that will last a lifetime. I learned things about myself and life that I never would have being coddled in college. I'm so glad I made the choice I did to drop out and play poker, and similarly glad I was able to finish my degree and get a real job afterwards. I saw my share of people who crashed and burned and resorted to scamming and/or coaching (but I repeat myself ) and/or moving back in with their parents in their 30s when the money ran out. And everyone talking about the downsides of poker have been spot-on. It's a lonely game, variance is a *****, and although you may still enjoy it, definitely don't count on your current passion continuing a few years after you've been doing it full-time. You will run worse than you ever imagined you could, you will begin to question whether you're even a winning player anymore, you will begin to dread playing, and you will begin to play worse as a result of this, which leads to it being even more likely that the downswing continues.

Also finally if you have a 9-to-5 and think of yourself as "working for someone else", you're doing it wrong. Just as in poker you are working for yourself, and you are selling your services to other people. Improving your skills equates to you either getting a raise at your current job or being able to find another job that pays more, because you have something they value. Depending on career you could look into being a contractor/freelancer as well. Look at yourself as a 1-person business. If you're working a 9-to-5, that's only because the most profitable way to sell your services is to agree to provide 40 hours/week of your labor in exchange for a paycheck. Especially as you get better at your craft, you'll find more and more "customers" who are willing to be more flexible whether it's alternative work location/hours, fewer hours per week, more freedom to choose your own projects, etc.
Just wanted to say that this is EXCELLENT insight and a well written post!
DivineGlory is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2019, 11:20 PM   #368
bumpnrun
veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: lol imo
Posts: 2,333
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Especially the last paragraph very wel done
bumpnrun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2019, 12:05 AM   #369
barney big nuts
grinder
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 537
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

This message is hidden because bumpnrun is on your ignore list.
barney big nuts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2019, 12:29 AM   #370
bumpnrun
veteran
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: lol imo
Posts: 2,333
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Blacking out those with an alternate point of view to your own is a sign of a feeble mind
bumpnrun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2019, 02:23 AM   #371
JTJackal
centurion
 
JTJackal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 177
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Quote:
Originally Posted by zachvac View Post
Great thread, great variety of experiences/opinions. I'm only 29 but I played pro full-time from 2008 to 2013, or 19 to 24. At the time my motivations were money and freedom, and to 19 year old me I had a ton of both. Looking back the freedom was the biggest positive. I was able to travel/live in 15+ different countries and have some pretty amazing life experiences very few people my age (even now) have ever had. As for money though, I work now full-time as a data scientist. The money from poker was good but people underestimate how much money you can make in other jobs if you're the type of person who can succeed at poker. I just finished my 4th full year at my 9-to-5 and including retirement contributions+benefits I'm going to clear 150k. If I had skipped the poker and finished school+got a job right out of school I'd almost definitely be in the 200-250k range. This is right around where other people I went to high school with are that went into a similar field. Now I'm not saying that's easy to do, but I think most people good enough to come close to 6 figures in poker in 2018 could do it.

In addition, the work is far less stressful. Don't get me wrong, stress and variance still exists (lol at a real job having no variance), but it's naturally a lot lower with less built in randomness and working for someone else has the benefit of them eating some of the remaining variance. And people talk about all the freedom poker gives you, but for everyone in this thread who used their poker winnings to travel and go on trips there are another 100 poker pros who didn't leave their hometown or who "traveled" but never left the casino of whatever city the poker tournament they went to was. And you can also travel with a 9-to-5. I now get 25 vacation days per year (in addition to the company-wide 10 holidays) and can work remotely as long as it's not a regular occurrence. I generally do 1-2 international trips per year, which isn't as much as I traveled playing poker but I also don't have to "work" during my trips at all.

Anyway there's obviously downsides to a 9-to-5 as well. In poker I loved nothing better than someone being an arrogant idiot and being like "well now I get to take your money". In a corporate environment, oftentimes that arrogant idiot is a VP making millions per year who you need to impress in order for your career to advance, and oftentimes that VP will then use your work in order to advance their own career. And I certainly don't mean to downplay the positives of poker. I made so many friends and so many memories that will last a lifetime. I learned things about myself and life that I never would have being coddled in college. I'm so glad I made the choice I did to drop out and play poker, and similarly glad I was able to finish my degree and get a real job afterwards. I saw my share of people who crashed and burned and resorted to scamming and/or coaching (but I repeat myself ) and/or moving back in with their parents in their 30s when the money ran out. And everyone talking about the downsides of poker have been spot-on. It's a lonely game, variance is a *****, and although you may still enjoy it, definitely don't count on your current passion continuing a few years after you've been doing it full-time. You will run worse than you ever imagined you could, you will begin to question whether you're even a winning player anymore, you will begin to dread playing, and you will begin to play worse as a result of this, which leads to it being even more likely that the downswing continues.

Also finally if you have a 9-to-5 and think of yourself as "working for someone else", you're doing it wrong. Just as in poker you are working for yourself, and you are selling your services to other people. Improving your skills equates to you either getting a raise at your current job or being able to find another job that pays more, because you have something they value. Depending on career you could look into being a contractor/freelancer as well. Look at yourself as a 1-person business. If you're working a 9-to-5, that's only because the most profitable way to sell your services is to agree to provide 40 hours/week of your labor in exchange for a paycheck. Especially as you get better at your craft, you'll find more and more "customers" who are willing to be more flexible whether it's alternative work location/hours, fewer hours per week, more freedom to choose your own projects, etc.
Great post. Agree with everything.

The stress of having to win weighs heavy. 1 break even or losing year, and you're wondering why am I wasting my time sitting here? Significantly less fun treating it as a job.

Sure is sweet to win money doing it though, something about it.
JTJackal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2019, 10:01 AM   #372
helpmeinvest
enthusiast
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 53
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Early 40's here, I don't grind for a living, but I play a ton of hours basically breaking even/losing a little. Sad life.
helpmeinvest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2019, 11:34 PM   #373
PaulyJames200x
veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 2,414
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Do most agree that grinding for a living in your 40s+ or late 30s is probably easier live as oppose to online?



Could anyone here come up with a list of say 10 or 20 players who grind online fulltime that are at least late 30s?



The only person that came to my mind was that bigpocketdog guy but i don't believe he plays anymore. I know Lex is another guy but hes only 35 and not late 30s. But could you guys come up with a list of full time online grinders that are 35+? Moorman and Bparis i believe are a bit under 35. The list then must be pretty low then? I actually just thought of a guy that fits it and that is Elky. But are there many low key guys that are late 30s or older that grind full time online?


The thing that makes me wonder is when i look at all the tournaments that go on stars and 888poker and also on partypoker especially at the low and some medium stakes, there are players that seem to play almost everyday. Such as they are playing the daily tournaments at stars or 888 and they are playing 9+ hours everyday as many of them you would notice their username in tournaments...I guess it would be safe to assume most of these players are probably 18 to 28 or so? Im appalled at how so many players are playing this many hours. Im assuming they are not a bot.


I would assume people who are late 30s or older would have a tough time grinding 9-10 hours a day online say 5 days a week? Are there any guys here that do that. I remember when i was in my early to mid 20s, i could play 20 tables easily.
PaulyJames200x is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2019, 10:14 PM   #374
Shooter_Mcgavin
banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 11
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Id say that unless you are knees deep into grinding it isnt worth it anymore, thats probably why most poker boom players that kept playing still do so, but pretty much anyonne else hs branched out into smething else.
Shooter_Mcgavin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2019, 04:12 AM   #375
Pinkmann
adept
 
Pinkmann's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 959
Re: Anyone in age 40+ (or late 30's) grinding for living?

Playing 9-10 hours is tough for anyone, but I dont think being 40 makes playing online that much harder.

All the former pro video gamers I've heard will say they don't believe that being in your 20s gives you some magical ability, but rather they don't have any adult responsibilities that eat up their time since they all chose gaming over university. They can just practice 10-12 hrs/day. The same goes for poker. I would guess that newer full time pros are obviously young, but many will only do it throughout their 20s and then will move on bc of this urge to 'grow up'.

We don't see many guys in their 40s grinding online full time bc the people that got into it to begin with were in their 20s in the mid 2000s. Wait 10 years from now and you will see plenty of 40+ year old online grinders imo, assuming games are beatable.
Pinkmann is offline   Reply With Quote

Reply
      

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2008-2017, Two Plus Two Interactive
 
 
Poker Players - Streaming Live Online