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Old 12-27-2011, 08:40 PM   #1
longmissedblind
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Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6bekli_Tepe

Göbekli Tepe is home to the oldest religious mega/monolithic "temple" unearthed to date. In Turkey, Göbekli Tepe played host to a culture/early-civilization 6000 years before Stonehenge and 7000 years before the Pyramids of Giza.

Does this site push back the range of social design/political philosophy significantly enough to subvert the "power" of Western Civilization by proving the Egyptian/Hebrew ancient traditions were ridiculously outdated or contrived from millenia of previous religious tradition(s)?
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Old 12-27-2011, 09:15 PM   #2
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

Quote:
Archaeologist Klaus Schmidt comments on the significance of the site,

“definitive proof that a huge ceremonial site flourished here, a “Rome of the Ice Age,” as he puts it, where hunter-gatherers met to build a complex religious community. Across the hill, he has found carved and polished circles of stone, with terrazzo flooring and double benches. All the circles feature massive T-shaped pillars that evoke the monoliths of Easter Island…
source
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Old 01-01-2012, 08:09 PM   #3
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

Göbekli Tepe harkens lost pieces of our oral tradition back to about the same time the last ice age ended. That event caused water levels world wide to rise by 300-400 feet, drowning every coastline where large groups of humans likely congregated, producing the sort of environment from which legends are made.

Open GoogleEarth and look at all the areas around the world where the water is less than 400 feet deep. See the places that likely used to be inhabited by people... "civilized" people with buildings, beliefs and traditions, not just the savage quality known as "hunter/gatherer."
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Old 01-06-2012, 03:13 AM   #4
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

Amazing!
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Old 01-08-2012, 11:56 PM   #5
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

An obviously much, much later site, but it reminds me of Chaco Canyon. There you have these tremendously large buildings spread out over a huge area, meticulously laid out and no real evidence of any long term human habitation.

For those of you anywhere, but especially North America, it is a completely mind blowing experience to visit.

Great link, thanks.
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Old 03-03-2012, 10:39 PM   #6
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0517887290

This is a must read if u like these theories. Fingerprints of the Gods.
He talks about ancient advanced civilizations existing 15000 years earlier than what's widely accepted by modern day historians. He has some very compelling evidence. He also has a good book about the history of the Egyptian pyramids.
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Old 01-24-2015, 09:33 PM   #7
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

bump

Currently reading Inside the Neolithic Mind by David Lewis-Williams and David Pearce. In it the authors propose a hardwired neurological phenomenon in all people that led to the creation Mega/Monolithic sites like Göbekli Tepe and others (some of which are on the European Atlantic seaboard). Examples of neolithic sites are used as evidence of the mindset of the people of the time and why they (we) built the sites. The sites' designs may have accentuated spiritual belief, which in turn led to the domestication of plants and animals.

Other sites:
Nevali Çori
Jericho (yes, that Jericho)
Çatalhöyük
Çayönü
'Ain Ghazal

I'm only halfway through so nothing on in Europe yet. Will bump thread again in 2 years...
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Old 01-31-2015, 06:56 PM   #8
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

Göbekli Tepe is pretty got-damn fascinating. Not a Graham Hancock fan but I'm increasingly open to the idea that our notions of the 'Story of Civilization' might be waaaaay off.
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Old 02-08-2015, 01:14 AM   #9
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

Interesting 3-tiered cosmos postulated in the book I linked. The suggestion is that all humans are hardwired with neuropsychological templates which produce similar "visions" expressed during altered states of consciousness. Shaman from around the world from as far back as 10,000 years ago and beyond structured cultural and consciousness contracts of early societies around a cosmology that included regularly tapping into alternate worlds meshed together with the daily lives of people.

Also, it pretty bluntly claims that religion and patriarchal hierarchy led to the domestication of plants and animals (and people), a view which I tend to be sympathetic towards.
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Old 04-17-2015, 02:38 PM   #10
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

Quote:
“We think that artworks were made to get in touch with the dead or to protect them,” Hodder said, stressing that Çatalhöyük’s artwork, like the many wall paintings discovered in houses, was very rich in terms of symbolism. “Another reason why Çatalhöyük is very important is that all wall paintings and objects were protected very well. When you visit Çatalhöyük and go to these houses, you can see both people and belongings of these people. It gives you the impression that your ancestors are still living with you,” he added.
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/cat...&NewsCatID=375

In his seminal work Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, Julian Jaynes made the claim that schizophrenia was an active component of human development, and that not only did these ancient peoples communicate with their dead elders, they actually heard them speak as though they were still alive to talk.
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Old 11-26-2017, 11:41 PM   #11
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

Quote:
Originally Posted by longmissedblind View Post
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/cat...&NewsCatID=375

In his seminal work Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, Julian Jaynes made the claim that schizophrenia was an active component of human development, and that not only did these ancient peoples communicate with their dead elders, they actually heard them speak as though they were still alive to talk.
I read somewhere that many ancient Shamans were schizophrenics, lol.
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Old 12-04-2017, 02:28 PM   #12
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Re: Göbekli Tepe and The Earliest Monument

Found something in Europe: Lion-man


Quote:
The lion-headed figurine is the oldest-known zoomorphic (animal-shaped) sculpture in the world, and the oldest-known uncontested example of figurative art. It has been determined to be between 35,000 and 40,000 years old by carbon dating of material from the layer in which it was found, and thus, is associated with the archaeological Aurignacian culture.[1] It was carved out of woolly mammoth ivory using a flint stone knife. Seven parallel, transverse, carved gouges are on the left arm.
source

This isn't a recreation of reality. This is the imagining of a man-beast carved with precision over tens or hundreds of hours.... 40,000 years ago
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