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Old 06-10-2011, 06:19 AM   #101
igetjokes
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Re: The First World War

Quote:
Originally Posted by pofigistka View Post
Thought this article on tunneling to undermine the enemy's position in WWI was rather interesting. I was completely unaware this went on.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-13630203
There is a superb work of fiction dealing with this less known part of WW1, 'Birdsong' by Sebastian Faulks. Highly recommended.
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Old 06-18-2011, 09:54 AM   #102
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Re: The First World War

Super over simplified reason for WWI outcome.

Start with stalemate. Add 500,000 troops to the side struggling to keep their army armed and fed. Add 10,000 troops per day to the side with no problem keeping their army armed and fed.
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Old 07-12-2011, 06:49 AM   #103
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Re: The First World War

Finished Ken Follet's Book: Fall of Giants .
Which shows 5 families through the 1914-1918 period and thought it was very well written and gave insights from every side of the war.

Definately recommend.
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Old 07-12-2011, 02:46 PM   #104
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Re: The First World War



We Are Making a New World



The Mule Track



The Ypres Salient at Night

All by Paul Nash.
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Old 04-13-2012, 04:29 PM   #105
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Re: The First World War



Gunners pulling Cannons, Ypres by William Roberts



Troops resting by Christopher Nevinson



The Road from Arras to Bapaume by Christopher Nevinson

Last edited by Wamy Einehouse; 04-13-2012 at 04:50 PM. Reason: PS this post is for MsBlueberry
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Old 10-29-2012, 05:15 PM   #106
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Re: The First World War



A pyramid of dead German soldier's helmets in New York's Grand Central station, 1918. More details here.
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Old 10-31-2012, 10:54 AM   #107
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Re: The First World War

Amazing paintings and pictures Wamy. Love that cubist-ish worldwar 1 stuff.

Im currently reading guns of august for the first time. I was a bit skeptical when i saw how old school it was compared to some of the recent world war 1 stuff, but i have to say it is very well written.
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Old 11-03-2012, 02:11 PM   #108
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Re: The First World War

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Originally Posted by Adaptation View Post
Amazing paintings and pictures Wamy. Love that cubist-ish worldwar 1 stuff.

Im currently reading guns of august for the first time. I was a bit skeptical when i saw how old school it was compared to some of the recent world war 1 stuff, but i have to say it is very well written.

I read this years ago; it was recommend by a History Professor that put together for us students a summer reading list.

By the time you finish, I think you will be suitable impressed with the book.
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:26 AM   #109
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Re: The First World War

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Originally Posted by Zeno View Post
I read this years ago; it was recommend by a History Professor that put together for us students a summer reading list.

By the time you finish, I think you will be suitable impressed with the book.
I am only 4 chapters in and im shocked by how good guns of august is. Her description of the german military attitudes is amazing. It really shows that the german high command was really thinking in a Nietzsche ''supermen must rule'' and an obsession with the military. Love the moment with the kaiser where he proposed to the king of belgium an alliance against france in exchange for the re-creation of the kingdom of burgundy. ''much as changed since the 15th century'' says the king of belgium. Kaiser goes in a tantrum.

I could not believe the kaiser would offer deals like those. Blew my mind away.
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Old 11-04-2012, 02:42 AM   #110
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Re: The First World War

There have to be some good books about Kaiser Wilhelm II out there, his series of (mostly diplomatic) blunders is amazing.

Here's a good summary of the Daily Telegraph affair from wikipedia:

Quote:
The Daily Telegraph Affair of 1908 involved his publication of an interview with a British daily newspaper that included wild statements and diplomatically damaging remarks. Wilhelm saw it as an opportunity to promote his views and ideas on Anglo-German friendship, but instead, due to his emotional outbursts during the course of the interview, he ended up further alienating not only the British people, but also the French, Russians and Japanese by implying, among other things, that the Germans cared nothing for the British; that the French and Russians had attempted to incite Germany to intervene in the Second Boer War; and that the German naval buildup was targeted against the Japanese, not Britain.
That's just perfect.
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Old 11-04-2012, 11:36 AM   #111
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Re: The First World War

Italian units at Soča river





Soška fronta( Battles of the Isonzo) was one of the bloodiest battles in WW1. Italians had around 300,000 casualties on this front and Austro-Hungarians around 200k(this are the low numbers, some predictions claim that combined it was around 1 million death soldiers on this front). It lasted for 2 years(from 1915 to 1917)... Statisticly 28 soldiers died every hour for two years, 1 soldier every 2 and some minute.... Ernest Hemingway wrote about it in his novel A Farewell to Arms.





http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battles_of_the_Isonzo

Last edited by Andz; 11-04-2012 at 11:42 AM.
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Old 11-08-2012, 07:17 PM   #112
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Re: The First World War

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Originally Posted by plaaynde View Post
They tried to dig under the lines though and use explosives, that´s a bit creative.
Sappers have been tunneling under castle walls since medieval times. Before the invention of gunpowder, oily pig carcasses were used.
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Old 09-09-2014, 07:58 PM   #113
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Re: The First World War

Hey, so I'm listening to the newest episode of Dan Carlin's Hardcore History and around 58:45 he mentions a German soldier being blown into a French fort at Verdun and the soldier "opens doors one by one" and locks up French soldiers until they're all locked up. I thought this was pretty amazing, but I couldn't find anything through a google search.

Last edited by evechad; 09-09-2014 at 08:15 PM.
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Old 09-10-2014, 01:28 PM   #114
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Re: The First World War

He's probably referring to the capture of Fort Douaumont, although the true(r) story is different to the propaganda.

The fort had been stripped of its guns and was only manned by around 60 reservists commanded by a sergeant - no officers.

A 10 man team of combat engineers of the Brandenberg regiment climbed through an unmanned gun port, took the occupants prisoner and captured the fort.

Wiki link as a start point for you

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Douaumont
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Old 09-10-2014, 03:42 PM   #115
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Re: The First World War

I see, thanks for the response and the link. I read through the wiki and I think this is probably who he was referring too.

From the wiki:

"Kunze and his men reached the fort's moat and found that the wall casemates ("coffres") defending the moat were unoccupied. Kunze managed to climb inside one of them to open an access door.[2] But his men refused to go inside the fortifications as they feared an ambush. Armed only with a bolt-action rifle, the Pioneer-Sergeant entered alone.[3] He wandered around the empty tunnels until he found the artillery team, captured them and locked them up.
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Old 09-28-2014, 04:32 PM   #116
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Re: The First World War



Conrad Felixmüller, Soldat im Irrenhaus [Soldier in the Madhouse]



Adolf Erbslöh, Destroyed Forest near Verdun



Otto Dix, Trenches



Gino Severini, Armored Train



David Bomberg, Sappers at Work: A Canadian Tunelling Company
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Old 09-28-2014, 04:37 PM   #117
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Re: The First World War

Magpies in Picardy by Constance Oliver:

Quote:
THE magpies in Picardy
Are more than I can tell.
They flicker down the dusty roads
And cast a magic spell
On the men who march through Picardy,
Through Picardy to hell.

(The blackbird flies with panic,
The swallow goes like light,
The finches move like ladies,
The owl floats by at night ;
But the great and flashing magpie
He flies as artists might.)

A magpie in Picardy
Told me secret things —
Of the music in white feathers,
And the sunlight that sings
And dances in deep shadows —
He told me with his wings.

(The hawk is cruel and rigid,
He watches from a height ;
The rook is slow and sombre,
The robin loves to fight ;
But the great and flashing magpie
He flies as lovers might.)

He told me that in Picardy,

An age ago or more,

While all his fathers still were eggs,

These dusty highways bore

Brown singing soldiers marching out

Through Picardy to war.
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Old 09-29-2014, 04:21 PM   #118
DoTheMath
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Re: The First World War

More trenches by Dix:



"Detail of the Trenches near Reims II"





"Sunken Road", by Frederick Varley





"The Fall", by C. Chatwood Burton
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Old 10-01-2014, 09:08 AM   #119
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Re: The First World War

i'm a little late to this thread, but what an incredible time in history. i listened to the first tow portions of dan carlisle's armageddon podcast with regard to ww1. unbelievable. the poetry and art in this thread really drives home how completely and utterly hopeless it must have felt to have been a conscripted soldier (mind you, our age in many cases excepting the brits who were maybe older having been more experienced!)

just mind blowing.

the last painting you referenced, "the fall" really struck a chord with me. it reminded me of two of my favorite paintings in different era's but that display similar hopelessness.

the first is JMW's "the slave ship"



the second is gericault's la meduse.

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Old 11-21-2014, 05:18 PM   #120
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Re: The First World War

If you get a chance, read All Quiet On The Western Front by Erich Remarque. I don't recall him ever saying that he hated the people he was fighting against.
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Old 11-21-2014, 08:56 PM   #121
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Re: The First World War

lol documents
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Old 11-22-2014, 06:23 PM   #122
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Re: The First World War

This commercial has been stirring up some conversation, sentiment, and controversy of late:

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Old 11-22-2014, 06:34 PM   #123
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Re: The First World War

that's fantastic.

what's controversial about it?
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Old 11-22-2014, 09:44 PM   #124
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Re: The First World War

Quote:
Originally Posted by wiper View Post
that's fantastic.

what's controversial about it?
Some people think it sanitizes the First World War. Others think it's crass to use the memory of the Great War to promote commercialism in the form of a chain store.

One example of critique here.
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Old 11-23-2014, 01:59 PM   #125
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Re: The First World War

In London recently, see the pic below taken in Hyde Park and note the red poppy in my shirt (which I received by making a donation to the Royal British Legion).




I just happened to be in London for Remembrance Day though I had not thought of that when making my plans. Anyway, I visited Trafalgar Square on Saturday the 8th and a statue of a soldier, within a glass case, was set up with paper poppies blowing about within the enclosed structure. The soldier was represented in a WW1 uniform. It was a somewhat moving experience for me because my Great Uncle, Fred Thompson, was in France during the Great War. I remember visiting his home often and he had much memorabilia, including some rifles, which he had brought back from France.

British Legion Link below:

http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/abou...ce-sunday-2014

Why the Poppies? See link below

http://www.greatwar.co.uk/poems/john...ers-fields.htm

****************************


In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

by John McCrae, May 1915

***********************

We should always remember and honor those that sacrificed the most.
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