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Old 02-08-2009, 02:44 AM   #1
Zeno
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Jazz: America's Music

Today I purchased Blue Train by John Coltrane (on the blue note label) -Excellent and beautiful flowing Jazz work. Complimentary and solo work by an ensemble of trumpet, trombone, piano, bass, and of course percussion, with the ethereal tones of John Coltrane’s tenor sax. Listening to this album rekindle my interest in Jazz – American’s Music. It reminded me of the Ken Burns documentary on Jazz that premiered on PBS in 2001 (which also inspired a CD set and a single CD, The Best of Ken Burns Jazz, that I have). But I digress. My collection of Jazz music is small but I would like to enhance it so best recommendations on that would be welcome and helpful to everybody else as well.

Additionally this post is for just a general discussion of Jazz. Below is a list of the Jazz artists that are mentioned in the context of The Best of Ken Burns Jazz CD set. It is not intended as an inclusive list by any means and is made in alphabetical order, although the first person should be place number one on the list anyway. This jazz list does not include newer artists, Diana Krall just for an example. So it needs brought up to date, which I hope others will do.

Louis Armstrong
Count Basie
Sidney Bechet
Art Blakey
Dave Brubeck
Omette Coleman
John Coltrane
Miles Davis
Duke Ellington
Ella Fitzgerald
Dizzy Gillesepe
Benny Goodman
Herbie Hannock
Coleman Hawkins
Fletcher Henderson
Billie Holiday
Charles Mingus
Theionious Monk
Charlie Parker
Sonny Rollins
Sarah Vaughn
Lester Young


Jazz deserves some fun and worthwhile discussion on these forums. So, Take it Away…………….

-Zeno

Last edited by Zeno; 02-08-2009 at 02:51 AM.
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Old 02-08-2009, 09:46 AM   #2
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

I like Chet Baker. Very chill music.

It reminds me of snowy winters in the Northeast.
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Old 02-08-2009, 11:45 AM   #3
Max H
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeno View Post
Louis Armstrong
Count Basie
Sidney Bechet
Art Blakey
Dave Brubeck
Omette Coleman
John Coltrane
Miles Davis
Duke Ellington
Ella Fitzgerald
Dizzy Gillesepe
Benny Goodman
Herbie Hannock
Coleman Hawkins
Fletcher Henderson
Billie Holiday
Charles Mingus
Theionious Monk
Charlie Parker
Sonny Rollins
Sarah Vaughn
Lester Young


Jazz deserves some fun and worthwhile discussion on these forums. So, Take it Away…………….

-Zeno
Please add Clifford Brown, Max Roach, Bud Powell, Art Tatum, Lee Morgan, Bill Evans, Hank Jones and Horace Silver among many others.

The broad range of jazz styles provides a lifetime of delight for the devotee. As an American I find it ironic that true American music like jazz, blues and vintage country seem more popular outside of the US than within.
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Old 02-08-2009, 03:13 PM   #4
Wynton
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

Not sure what the goal of this thread is. If you want more recommendations on jazz, I'm going to need some more info about what you like. The universe of music considered "jazz" by people is simply too broad.

For example, if you want recommendations of other albums like "Bluetrain," I can oblige. Or if you want artists similar to Sonny Rollins, I can take a stab at it. Provide some more information about what you are looking for (if that is the point of the thread).
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Old 02-08-2009, 06:47 PM   #5
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Originally Posted by Zeno View Post
Today I purchased Blue Train by John Coltrane (on the blue note label) -Excellent and beautiful flowing Jazz work. Complimentary and solo work by an ensemble of trumpet, trombone, piano, bass, and of course percussion, with the ethereal tones of John Coltrane’s tenor sax. Listening to this album rekindle my interest in Jazz – American’s Music. It reminded me of the Ken Burns documentary on Jazz that premiered on PBS in 2001 (which also inspired a CD set and a single CD, The Best of Ken Burns Jazz, that I have). But I digress. My collection of Jazz music is small but I would like to enhance it so best recommendations on that would be welcome and helpful to everybody else as well.
Good LORD, Blue Train is a good album. You hit it right on the head, too; Coltrane's playing elevates anything he's on, even as a sideman, but Blue Train is the first to really highlight his skills as a composer and bandleader.

I'd move on to Giant Steps, then on to the amazing but sometimes more experimental quartet recordings on the Impulse label. Particularly Crescent and the justifiably acclaimed A Love Supreme
. Crescent is very underrated, I think, worthy for how far he can take his band before they start getting into the more "Out" sounds of his final works. It is a microcosmic distillation of not just his work, but the history of jazz itself.

And it's just my opinion...but a copy of A Love Supreme belongs in every household, right between the Bible and the shotgun.

If you are so inclined, I recommend (and just reread, myself) Ascension/John Coltrane and his Quest by Eric Nisenson. It's about a decade old, but I read a lot of music literature, particularly biographies, and it is one of the best and most informative. One of the blurbs on the back of the jacket (from the NYT Book review) refers to it as "part biography, part jazz history, and partlistener's guide", which well describes it's utility. I used to recommend it to anyone who was just getting into the genre. Also, the AllMusic Guide and All About Jazz are helpful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeno View Post
Additionally this post is for just a general discussion of Jazz. Below is a list of the Jazz artists that are mentioned in the context of The Best of Ken Burns Jazz CD set. It is not intended as an inclusive list by any means and is made in alphabetical order, although the first person should be place number one on the list anyway. This jazz list does not include newer artists, Diana Krall just for an example. So it needs brought up to date, which I hope others will do.

Louis Armstrong
Count Basie
Sidney Bechet
Art Blakey
Dave Brubeck
Omette Coleman
John Coltrane
Miles Davis
Duke Ellington
Ella Fitzgerald
Dizzy Gillesepe
Benny Goodman
Herbie Hannock
Coleman Hawkins
Fletcher Henderson
Billie Holiday
Charles Mingus
Theionious Monk
Charlie Parker
Sonny Rollins
Sarah Vaughn
Lester Young
As Max H alluded to earlier, there is a lifetime of listening. This list alone could keep you occupied for years, and it's just a good start.

At the risk of sounding like a pretentious tool (aaah, what the hell...I'm not fooling anybody at this point any way), I'm going to give you five personal favorites that I think should be in any jazz library. Some of the artists listed above (Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Louie Armstrong, Charlie Parker) will be missing, as the period they recorded dictated less emphasis on the album as a stand alone entity. As such, their music, which is indeed indispensable, is best heard in anthologized form. The artists below can also be heard in such fashion, and that may not be a bad idea. That Ken Burns CD series is a great place to start. But the albums in my top 5 list have an expressive power that is best revealed ni the context in which they were initially released.

1) Miles Davis-Kind of Blue
Still my vote for the single greatest recorded entity in the short history of recorded music. It dictated the cliches and defined post bop jazz. It's consistently revelatory without diluting the sheer emotion that the sounds and structure convey. As I mentioned earlier, Trane's presence here elevates without lapsing into vulgar dominance. The interplay and complementary melodic creativity between the three horns (In addition to Miles on trumpet and Trane on tenor, the amazing Cannonball Adderley provides the perfect funky counterpoint to both Mile's relaxed but raw emotional expression, and Trane's harder intensity. And the word "gorgeous" was invented for Bill Evan's piano work on "Blue in Green". And Paul Chambers on bass and Jimmy Cobb on drums are simply perfect; they don't just build a foundation that the soloists can build on, they subtly add sonic dimensions that enhance the richness of the music being made. Chambers, in particular, shines, partly due to his role; as this was an album of modal experimentation, he could veer off from the more restrictive "chord defining" functions he was normally asked to fulfill, and so had more of a say in the music's progree and impact. But it is not a stretch to say that Kind of Blue would have been far less musically successful had a bassist of lesser empathy and expression been involved. Plus, one of the more under rated jazz pianists, Wynton Kelly, takes over for Evans on one cut, and swings mightily. Everything on this set fits perfectly. A friend of mine, a guitar player not normally given to jazz, once told me he loved Kind of Blue because it was "five guys making music...not just playing, or doing a song...they're making music".

2)A Love Supreme -John Coltrane
Less "number 2" than "1B", this four section suite is more meditation than swinging affair. The swing is there (albeit more graceful than manic), but not for it's own sake.

I know of no piece (with the possible exception of Beethoven's Ninth) that reveals with successive listenings as much as A Love Supreme does. In fact, it may take a few listenings to even begin to "get" it, or at least to see how this is more than just a set of nice sounds.

It is also, I think, drummer Elvin Jones' finest hour. The idea of breaking from single-minded time keeping, and adding to the overall texture, was nothing new. And Elvin had long been known as a "busy" and powerful drummer. But here, he uses the drums as a melodic embellishment in a much subtler fashion, emphasizing underlying themes and melodies, rather than simply accenting the main (and most obvious ) ones, which adds a depth and richness that enhances it's revelatory nature.

3)Mingus Ah Um - Charles Mingus
Bassist/composer Minus faced accusations early in his career that his music didn't "swing". Must have stuck in his craw a bit, because nothing has the uniquely fierce swing he coaxed out of his bands around this time, and especially on this album. Without losing any of the coloring or texture he was known for. His septet, a bigger band than most were willing to work with at the time, gave him the voices he needed, while keeping the fluidity agility of a much smaller grouping. Black Saint and the Sinner Lady is another Mingus set that achieves that very difficult result, and some would say that for sheer musical inventiveness, it belongs on the list. But Ah Um is equally inventive, if less complex, while more vividly displaying both Mingus' playfulness and his anger. Sometimes within the same song. Indeed, he often turns one into the other.

4)Time Out-Dave Brubeck Quartet
With their willingness to use odd time signatures and their precise delivery, "funky" would not be a very accurate description. Their swing was organic, but mannered, and their delivery could seem more formal statement than joyful expression. Still, in Altoist Paul Desmond, they had one of jazz's true originals, a soloist for whom the word "lyrical" has probably been used trillions of times, and is devastatingly accurate.

Tangentially associated with "third stream" music, an ill-defined and self-conscious attempt to meld equal parts jazz and western classical influences, they (along with artists such as Bill Evans and The Modern Jazz Quarter) were able to transcend such goofy labeling and develop a natural and unique sound. Time Out is not a revolutionary album (except, perhaps, in a commercial sense), but it is unusually stocked with musical ideas and subtle expression.

5) Out to Lunch!-Eric Dolphy
This is the most "Out" thing on the list, with staggering rhythms, unusual and even abrasive phrasing, and dissonant touches. The musicians at time seem to ramble amongst themselves. Plus, the extensive and jarring use of Bobby Hutcherson's vibraphone lends a chaotic and almost satirical air to the proceedings. If it's not really "free jazz", in the Ornette Coleman vein, it's still far more chaotic than the mainstream listener will probably allow for. Definitely not for every taste, and not an "easy" listen. Still, if you're willing to step outside of conventional notions, such participatory listening will be rewarded.

If you want to hew a little close to the mainstream, substitute Saxophone Colossus by Sonny Rollins, or split the difference with the tricky and complex, but not-quite-as-harsh-as-the Dolphy Brilliant Corners by Thelonious Monk. That Brilliant Corners is a Hall of Fame caliber album, yet does not represent Monk as well as an anthology of his work would illustrate, is a testament to his genius.

Once again, someone has asked me the time, and I have spent an inordinate amount of time telling them how to make a watch. I apologize for such long windedness, but I look forward to seeing what other have to say, as well.
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Old 02-08-2009, 11:58 PM   #6
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Originally Posted by kudzudemon View Post
Good LORD, Blue Train is a good album. You hit it right on the head, too; Coltrane's playing elevates anything he's on, even as a sideman, but Blue Train is the first to really highlight his skills as a composer and bandleader...... ETC .
Thanks for the very informative post. Just ordered:

Mingus Ah Um - Charles Mingus
Kind of Blue (Legacy Edition) - Miles Davis
Giant Steps - John Coltrane
Time Out - The Dave Brubeck Quartet
A Love Supreme - John Coltrane


-Zeno
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Old 02-09-2009, 12:11 AM   #7
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Not sure what the goal of this thread is. If you want more recommendations on jazz, I'm going to need some more info about what you like. The universe of music considered "jazz" by people is simply too broad.

For example, if you want recommendations of other albums like "Bluetrain," I can oblige. Or if you want artists similar to Sonny Rollins, I can take a stab at it. Provide some more information about what you are looking for (if that is the point of the thread).
As you noted Jazz covers a large spectrum. Kudzudemon covered some instrumental works but obviously there is much more, such as great female Jazz singers both current and from the rich past, and different jazz bands. Just take a stab discussing what you like best; I'm sure it will be interesting and informative.

-Zeno
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Old 02-09-2009, 12:15 AM   #8
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Originally Posted by Max H View Post
Please add Clifford Brown, Max Roach, Bud Powell, Art Tatum, Lee Morgan, Bill Evans, Hank Jones and Horace Silver among many others.

The broad range of jazz styles provides a lifetime of delight for the devotee. As an American I find it ironic that true American music like jazz, blues and vintage country seem more popular outside of the US than within.
Jazz and Blues especially have been very popular in Europe for a long time and have a loyal following, and many American musicians have spent years there playing and recording and touring.

-Zeno
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Old 02-09-2009, 12:21 AM   #9
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

Everytime I listen to jazz I think about how complex and intricate the music really is, and how little of it I actually understand. I just can't help but feel like jazz is made by and for great musicians, and that I should have no part in it.
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Old 02-09-2009, 03:01 AM   #10
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Everytime I listen to jazz I think about how complex and intricate the music really is, and how little of it I actually understand. I just can't help but feel like jazz is made by and for great musicians, and that I should have no part in it.
Actually, most jazz fans I know, at least the real aficionados, are not musicians. The thing about jazz is, because it can have a complexity other musics don't have (especially harmonically), you may have to develop your ears to fully appreciate it. Listening to jazz is much more participatory than most popular music, although it can be appreciated in the same surface fashion. But if listened to with intensity, it can be incredibly rewarding. Also, since it is often instrumental, there is less often an obvious "hook" to grab and use as an emotional reference. It's much more ephemeral. Even when lyrics are added, it is less precisely about the lyrics than how they are delivered.

You may be breaking it down when you listen, trying to analyze it from a craftsman's point of view. If you are a musician, that's an easy trap to fall into. Try to forget about how intricate and complex it is, and just get lost in it. Hell, the first two albums I mentioned I would recommend to anyone, even if they were not fans or intending to be. But you should never think you "have no part of it".
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Old 02-09-2009, 08:59 AM   #11
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Originally Posted by kudzudemon View Post

1) Miles Davis-Kind of Blue
A friend of mine, a guitar player not normally given to jazz, once told me he loved Kind of Blue because it was "five guys making music...not just playing, or doing a song...they're making music".
This was likely a result of Miles providing very little information to the players prior to the recording. There was also very little rehearsal prior to recording. That is why this record always gives the impression that the listener is hearing the songs being created as opposed to just being played.

One could spend a significant amount of time exploring the work of Miles alone. His willingness to constantly explore new territories, some of which angered many, separates him from his contemporaries.
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Old 02-09-2009, 09:36 AM   #12
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

Kind of Blue was my first Jazz album. I was 13 or 14 and first I thought it was boring as hell, but I kept at it for a while and now I've listened to it so many times I could sing the solos on there from memory.

Similar with Coltrane. Got some getting used to, but one day his sound "clicked" for me and I understood what he was trying to get at. I found it helpful to pay attention to the piano (if he's playing with one) to keep track of the harmony. Aside from legendary albums like Giant Steps, A Love Supreme, personal favourites of mine include his work with Monk, and he has a live album, One Up, One Down with Red Garland and McCoy Tyner I'm always going back to.

I've been listening to a lot of Cool Jazz lately, which is great because it feels like I'm discovering an entirely new genre. Gerry Mulligan and Miles Davis's Birth of the Cool is an essential album from this genre I think. Also check out this video of Stan Getz!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G42XUqap3a8

I wouldn't worry too much about the "complexity" of jazz. There's really nothing to "get" on an intellectual level so much as there's getting used to the sounds of the different instruments and learning how to pay attention to the separate sections of the band. In my teens I grew up worshiping 'guitar gods' like Satriani, Eric Johnson, etc but one thing I started noticing with them is that the rhythm sections they tend to play with are really ****ing boring. I mean if you look at the personnel for albums like Kind of Blue you won't find anyone on there who plays any sort of a "secondary" role int he music. Paul Chambers! Bill Evans! Tony Williams!

Last edited by Rabbit Angstrom; 02-09-2009 at 09:46 AM.
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Old 02-09-2009, 01:47 PM   #13
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Originally Posted by Zeno View Post
As you noted Jazz covers a large spectrum. Kudzudemon covered some instrumental works but obviously there is much more, such as great female Jazz singers both current and from the rich past, and different jazz bands. Just take a stab discussing what you like best; I'm sure it will be interesting and informative.

-Zeno
I really can't "discuss what I like best" without some direction; again, that's too big a topic to tackle for me, without guidance.

Since you mentioned singers, though, I guess I'll list my favorites and take it from there.

In no particular order, these are my favorite singers (not meant to be a list of the "greatest," just my personal taste):

Betty Carter
Ella Fitzgerald
Jon Hendricks
Billie Holiday
Eddie Jefferson
Louis Armstrong (he was extremely influential as a vocalist too)
Dinah Washington
Frank Sinatra
Sarah Vaughn

and a special mention to a vocal group that is kind of a mixture of gospel and jazz, and the best acapella group I've ever heard:

Take Six
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Old 02-09-2009, 02:09 PM   #14
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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I really can't "discuss what I like best" without some direction; again, that's too big a topic to tackle for me, without guidance.

Since you mentioned singers, though, I guess I'll list my favorites and take it from there.

In no particular order, these are my favorite singers (not meant to be a list of the "greatest," just my personal taste):

Betty Carter
Ella Fitzgerald
Jon Hendricks
Billie Holiday
Eddie Jefferson
Louis Armstrong (he was extremely influential as a vocalist too)
Dinah Washington
Frank Sinatra
Sarah Vaughn

and a special mention to a vocal group that is kind of a mixture of gospel and jazz, and the best acapella group I've ever heard:

Take Six
Wynton, any opinion on the Coltrane/Johnny Hartman album?

Last edited by kudzudemon; 02-09-2009 at 02:18 PM.
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Old 02-09-2009, 02:17 PM   #15
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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One could spend a significant amount of time exploring the work of Miles alone. His willingness to constantly explore new territories, some of which angered many, separates him from his contemporaries.
Boy, you said it. I first got into Miles through those "electric " albums, primarily the Jack Johnson album. Funny, because I really don't care for electric jazz, anymore. But I remember him being lambasted for his willingness to experiment with electric instrumentation.
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Old 02-09-2009, 02:19 PM   #16
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Originally Posted by Zeno View Post
Thanks for the very informative post. Just ordered:

Mingus Ah Um - Charles Mingus
Kind of Blue (Legacy Edition) - Miles Davis
Giant Steps - John Coltrane
Time Out - The Dave Brubeck Quartet
A Love Supreme - John Coltrane


-Zeno
You realize reviews will be expected...
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Old 02-09-2009, 02:34 PM   #17
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Wynton, any opinion on the Coltrane/Johnny Hartman album?
It's a masterpiece, and similar to Kind of Blue in the sense that it is enjoyed and appreciated by many who are not jazz aficionados. While most (if not all) of the cuts are ballads - which was somewhat unusual for that particular Coltrane band - there is an edge and freshness at the same time.
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Old 02-09-2009, 03:55 PM   #18
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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This was likely a result of Miles providing very little information to the players prior to the recording. There was also very little rehearsal prior to recording. That is why this record always gives the impression that the listener is hearing the songs being created as opposed to just being played.

One could spend a significant amount of time exploring the work of Miles alone. His willingness to constantly explore new territories, some of which angered many, separates him from his contemporaries.
Miles is one of my all-time favorite musicians and his spontaneity and willingness to experiment with new sounds/genres are probably the main reasons why. Whenever I listen to Bitches Brew I still can't help but ask the same question I asked myself when I first heard the album many years ago, what on earth am I listening to?

I just ordered the Complete On the Corner and Cellar Door Sessions, OTC was a little pricey at $85 but I'm really looking forward to the 120 page booklet/liner notes.
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Old 02-09-2009, 05:07 PM   #19
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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Originally Posted by kudzudemon View Post
Boy, you said it. I first got into Miles through those "electric " albums, primarily the Jack Johnson album. Funny, because I really don't care for electric jazz, anymore. But I remember him being lambasted for his willingness to experiment with electric instrumentation.
My brother became a Miles Davis fan well before I did because my first exposure to him was through the electric stuff (he also got to see him live six or seven times). I became a fan after listening to Kind of Blue and Sketches of Spain for the first time. Gradually, I grew to like the electric stuff, and the Jack Johnson album became a favorite. But most of my Miles collection is made up of various early recordings.
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Old 02-09-2009, 05:22 PM   #20
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

Unfortunately this CD is now out of print, but used copies can be had cheaply (probably bootlegs), and it's a great introduction to American Jazz. Paul Whiteman's concert at the Aeolian Hall in 1924 marked the introduction of several wonderful features, but none more important than Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue. This event, like the 1917 Armory Show, which changed the American art scene forever, is a watershed event in American culture. The CD features Dick Hyman on the piano.

http://www.amazon.com/Birth-Rhapsody.../dp/B000000FPW
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Old 02-09-2009, 06:28 PM   #21
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

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It's a masterpiece, and similar to Kind of Blue in the sense that it is enjoyed and appreciated by many who are not jazz aficionados. While most (if not all) of the cuts are ballads - which was somewhat unusual for that particular Coltrane band - there is an edge and freshness at the same time.
Yeah, it used to be one of the "gateway" albums I recommended. Interesting, I don't think Hartman ever sounded as good as he did here.

It's funny, Trane gets a lot of recognition for his marathon solos and his periods of enforced isolation in which he just played, as a meditative exercise, really. You tend to think of him as this solitary figure, playing long solo passages completely out of his head . But he was at his best, at least on tenor, when he was playing off someone: Miles, early on, or Hartman, or Dolphy. Even his best work within a strict quintet form was more dialogue with his band, especially Elvin.
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Old 02-09-2009, 06:30 PM   #22
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

Great Thread!

My HS years were spent listening and playing a lot of Jazz, being the trombone player I was. Played in a lot of jazz groups, mostly of the bigger band variety but really enjoyed all kinds.

I haven't listened to much Jazz over the last, well too many years and thought this would be an excellent excuse to listen to some again.

I have all the stuff on Kudzus list downloaded and am enjoying the Miles Davis selections right now as I type this. I'm diggin' it man!!!

I have to admit that I had a hard time with the Eric Dolphy stuff I quickly listened to. Not sure if I am going to be able to handle that stuff. I may atill give it another try though as I usually like things which are a bit "different".
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Old 02-09-2009, 06:58 PM   #23
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

Fish, there is a very good Dolphy CD called Last Date, which was recorded just over a month before he died. It wasn't his last session, there was one more.But this was recorded with a European rhythm section that he was so happy with, he had made plans to use them again. It's a live recording, a lot less chaotic than some of his stuff, much more standard than "free", although there is a clear elasticity to the band that sets it apart. Great version of "Epistrophy" to kick things off. And the version of "You Don't Know What Love Is" here is nothing short of amazing, with Dolphy doing some amazing flute work (an instrument I normally only tolerate). It's actually one of my personal favorites (I listen to it more than any other Dolphy, far more than the difficult Out to Lunch !), and I recommend it heartily.
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Old 02-09-2009, 07:05 PM   #24
Wynton
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

A couple of Eric Dolphy albums I recommend, neither of which are as outside as Out to Lunch:

The Berlin Concerts
Eric Dolphy in Europe.
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Old 02-09-2009, 07:33 PM   #25
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Re: Jazz: America's Music

Quote:
Originally Posted by kudzudemon View Post
Fish, there is a very good Dolphy CD called Last Date, which was recorded just over a month before he died. It wasn't his last session, there was one more.But this was recorded with a European rhythm section that he was so happy with, he had made plans to use them again. It's a live recording, a lot less chaotic than some of his stuff, much more standard than "free", although there is a clear elasticity to the band that sets it apart. Great version of "Epistrophy" to kick things off. And the version of "You Don't Know What Love Is" here is nothing short of amazing, with Dolphy doing some amazing flute work (an instrument I normally only tolerate). It's actually one of my personal favorites (I listen to it more than any other Dolphy, far more than the difficult Out to Lunch !), and I recommend it heartily.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wynton View Post
A couple of Eric Dolphy albums I recommend, neither of which are as outside as Out to Lunch:

The Berlin Concerts
Eric Dolphy in Europe.
I shall check out if they are available via Napster tonight! I actually kind of like the Jazz Flute thing IF it is done well. If not it is horrible.
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