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Old 06-18-2011, 08:34 AM   #181
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

indian steak doesn't really make any sense to me.
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Old 07-06-2011, 04:24 AM   #182
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

Theoretical question: is it possible to deep-fry in an oven? Like would it work to fill a pan with oil, put something like chicken in it, and then bake it in an oven at the maximum temperature? Would the oil boil? Would it turn out like deep-frying on a stove top?
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Old 07-06-2011, 05:24 AM   #183
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

I think you'd just start a fire that would destroy your oven. Why do you want to deep fry in your oven?
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Old 07-06-2011, 05:41 AM   #184
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

It's a theoretical question.
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Old 07-06-2011, 09:56 AM   #185
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

Theoretically, yes. Temperature is temperature. After enough time in a 400 degree oven, the oil will reach 400 degrees (or whatever cooking temp you want). My guess is that it would take a really long time since air is such a poor conductor of heat. The next problem will be that oil temp drops rapidly when cold food is added. Even if you could add food with the minimum amount of open oven door time, the oven would take far too long to bring the oil back up to cooking temp. Soggy, greasy food would be the result. Not to mention the danger of sliding an oven rack in and out with a full pot of 400 degree oil. I guess the only way to do it would be to calculate the amount of temp drop that you will get from the food and overheat the oil by the appropriate amount. Of course, that could cause the oil to smoke horribly, or to burn the outside of the food before the inside cooks through.

So, theoretically it is a really awful idea for pretty much every conceivable reason, but yes, you can heat up oil in an oven.
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Old 07-06-2011, 10:26 AM   #186
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Ho View Post
Anyone here anything cook anything Sous Vide? I have a setup and vacuum machine. I've done steaks, ribs of all kinds, eggs, and pork so far. Have Keller's sous vide cookbook but haven't done any yet.

Wondering if anyone here has had success with recipes using sous vide. Any serious cooks I'm open to letting you try your stuff out on my machine if you live in Vegas like I do.
I read about doing sous vide in a cooler and decided to give it a try.

Beer Cooler Sous Vide

There's a link in the comments to an excel spreadsheet that uses the weight of the food, specific heat of the food, amount of water, and final desired temp to determine the starting temp for the water.

I started with a 3 lb round eye roast with the goal of roast beef for sandwiches. This is a fairly cheap cut which tends to be tough. I was hoping that sous vide would help to tenderize.

Seasoned with salt and pepper, put in ziplock bag, suck out air.



The calculator suggested 122 degrees water temp for a final temp of 117. I was planning on searing after that which would bring the final temp up a little more.




I ran into some temp control problems. I guess the lid of my cooler isn't very well insulated. The sides stayed cool, but the lid felt very warm, so heat was escaping. I ended up losing at least 2-3 degrees per hour.

So, I took a potful of water out, heated it up to 170 or so and added it back in. Recheck temp, repeat as necessary.

I started around 4PM with the idea that I might leave it overnight. The rapid temp drop made me give up on that plan, so around 11:30 I called it quits.

The internal temp was 118. At no point was the water warmer than 123 or lower than 115, so I think I succeeded in that respect. I would have aimed for a lower temp in retrospect.

I then seasoned with salt and pepper and seared in a cast iron skillet with a little oil until browned.



Into the fridge overnight.

After slicing:


The result was pretty good. Definitely rare throughout. The colors are a little off on the photo, but the overall color is closest to that deeper red area at the top left. It still needs to be sliced thinly, since it is still a tougher cut of meat.

I can't say I would do this again - the rapid temp loss was too much of a hassle for longer times. I will try this for thinner items (salmon, steak) since the time in the water bath will be shorter.

Last edited by dylan's alias; 07-06-2011 at 10:31 AM. Reason: photo mix-up
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Old 07-11-2011, 08:35 PM   #187
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I made some beef pepperoni: Beef, wine, garlic, paprika, cayenne, ancho, pepper, salt

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Old 07-15-2011, 10:05 PM   #188
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

Blueberry crumb cake:



Sorry for the ****ty lighting in the pic. Was really good tho. It's a light cinnamony cake with a layer of blueberries, then some crunchy crumbly stuff on top.

112g butter
150g sugar
2 eggs
5g vanilla extract
175g ap flour
4g baking powder
1/2t cinnamon
80g buttermilk

cream butter + sugar, add eggs + vanilla, sift the dry **** and add it alternating with the buttermilk in 2 additions, pour onto a 1/4 sheet pan lined with oiled parchment

Take 280g of blueberries and spread them around evenly on the batter.

83g butter
140g ap flour
33g sugar
33g brown sugar
1/4t cinnamon

melt the butter, mix dry **** in a bowl, pour the butter in, then mix it just until it starts looking crumbly, then sprinkle over the blueberries and press it down gently. Bake 350* for 30-40 minutes until the top is golden and crunchy.
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Old 08-24-2011, 06:13 PM   #189
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

I'm just started curing some salmon, what should I serve alongside gravlax? Most suggestions I see are for something like rye bread and cucumber salad, but that's not so appealing (the rye bread part at least).

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Old 08-24-2011, 06:17 PM   #190
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

PGUK,

On white bread with lightly steamed, green asparagus and some dill on top. That's standard in my part of the world(where gravlax was invented btw). It's kind of boring, but if the salmon is good and the veggies are fresh it tastes great.
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Old 08-24-2011, 06:41 PM   #191
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

Chopped raw dill on top?

Thoughts on putting some home made mayo or hollandaise on top?
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Old 08-24-2011, 07:01 PM   #192
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

Yup, wikipedia says it's called "dill weed" to distinguish it from the dill seeds.



You can make a sauce/dressing with mayo, fresh dill weed, dijon mustard, S&P, and a little sugar. It's supposed to be a rich dressing and a little sweet. Depending on what kind of salmon you used it can be a bit too rich with fatty fish and rich dressing imo.

Another classic dressing is 1 part sweet mustard, 2 parts dijon or some other spicy/sour mustard, 1 part white wine vinegar, fresh chopped dill, S&P, sugar, and then oil until you get the right consistency. It's still a pretty rich dressing with the same sweet taste.

Last edited by Badafro; 08-24-2011 at 07:11 PM. Reason: another dressing
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Old 08-30-2011, 07:05 PM   #193
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

Does anyone have an informed opinion on organic food?
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Old 08-30-2011, 09:06 PM   #194
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

Quote:
Originally Posted by pat3392 View Post
Does anyone have an informed opinion on organic food?
I don't know if I am "informed" but do have a basic understanding. Organic is oftentimes a stamp used to increase the price of food based on it meeting certain regulations. I am excluding all processed foods here because for most of them organic doesn't help you all that much except for the exclusion of High Fructose Corn Syrup, etc. and you can find cheaper non-organic versions with very similar ingredients.

For meat, fruit and veggies, organic typically implies fresh and higher quality but is relatively overpriced. I would much rather buy "non-organic" (oh no they used pesticides) produce at the farmers market than much more expensive "organic" produce from Whole Foods any day. I buy organic when it is truly better in taste/quality than non-organic and otherwise just buy good local stuff. That being said, I live in NYC and have great markets and would think for most of the country "organic" is the only thing that will get you non-mass market fruit and veggies.

For meat, I actually tend to prefer non-organic and feel you pay a ton for organic without alot of benefit. You can get good grass fed beef, milk or cheese without paying the premium to ensure the animals never got antibiotics or whatever else "organic" requires.

I would imagine that for my hometown of 100k people in West Texas that the options are mostly likely "organic" and everything else as opposed to all the great "non-organic" stuff I get at local markets.
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Old 08-30-2011, 09:44 PM   #195
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Re: OOT Cooking thread 2011

the main problem with the organic label imo is that really small producers often can't afford the costs involved in getting certified, even though they usually use less pesticides and follow the spirit of organic growing much more strictly than larger producers who have technically organic products. It's a perfect example of how government intervention in the market usually favors the larger competitor.
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