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Old 02-14-2014, 03:26 PM   #5536
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

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W0X0F, congrats on your profit sharing Is that why you're going to vegas?
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I don't think pilots are included in the profit sharing, are they? Perhaps that's why he's going.
We're included, but I haven't even looked at my bank account to see how much was deposited. It's not life changing money, but nice of course. At least a few buy-ins.
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:05 AM   #5537
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

Are you notified if any Delta Executives are on board your flight? Are there special procedures for say if the CEO was on board? I assume they don't have a corporate jet like other CEO's do and sit in First Class. Can they fly in the jump seat?
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Old 02-17-2014, 01:45 PM   #5538
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

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Are you notified if any Delta Executives are on board your flight? Are there special procedures for say if the CEO was on board? I assume they don't have a corporate jet like other CEO's do and sit in First Class. Can they fly in the jump seat?
If there is any such notification, I'm unaware of it. I have no idea if a company exec has ever been on one of my flights. There was one time that I saw CEO Richard Anderson at DCA waiting for a flight among the rest of the passengers. It was an IRROPs-type day and flights were delayed and more than a few were cancelled. He sat talking to about five or six employees who were all trying to commute to work. He seemed like a very down-to-earth guy. I didn't see any special fussing over him by station personnel and that's probably the way he wants it.

The jump seat is not available to executives, but I imagine they could seek permission from the FAA to occupy it for a particular flight. It would have to be justified somehow as an operational necessity.
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Old 02-19-2014, 08:08 PM   #5539
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Hey W0X0F you probably missed my question few pages ago, if you like I can repost. Thanks!
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Old 02-19-2014, 10:55 PM   #5540
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

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HeyW0X0F,
I got a question for you, this is regarding Airbus 320 so you might not be familiar with the controls as with Boeing but here it goes.
We were flying back to JFK few months ago approaching Long Island over the ocean at around 6000ft ??maybe more or less but. I could tell the engines were at around idle or with little thrust. All of the sudden the engines spooled to what seemed like max thrust for few seconds and came back to normal for about 10 more minutes before landing. To me this seemed little odd, first of all we weren't climbing if anything we were descending. My first impression was the autopilot came off and the throttles was set to max??? Not sure if this is possible since auto throttle would pull back the lever.
Anyway, I am curious as to what might have caused this as I've never experienced anything similar. I may also add that it was a choppy approach with moderate winds but I doubt that played a role.
I'm not familiar with the Airbus flight logic so I can't really say what was going on here. But I do remember scenarios in the MD-88 where this kind of thing could happen and maybe this is similar. Basically, in the MD-88 there were two speed windows that the pilot had to set when climbing or descending: one was the speed to be maintained during the altitude change and the other was the target speed once the plane leveled off. It was kind of a weird little idiosyncrasy of the 88 and often caught pilots who forgot to set the level off speed. Thus, the plane might be descending at 200 kts (speed assigned by ATC), but the level off speed window had 250 kts set in it and the pilot neglected to update it. So once the plane leveled off the throttles would open up to achieve the higher speed set on the MCP. There would be a mad grab for the throttles or a quick change to the level flight speed window to stop the throttle burst. Classic rookie mistake.

Hard for me to think that the Airbus, with its modern software-based flight control systems, would have the same setup as the MD-88 but I really don't know.
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Old 02-20-2014, 06:07 AM   #5541
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I fly the 320 and it it could be a couple of things.

1. The pilots forgot to activate the approach phase whilst in a pilot selected speed, and when they reverted to, the managed speed which is computed by the FMGC and one of its uses is for the speeds to extend the flaps, the speed target would increase upto 250kts from say a selected 200, causing the engines to spool up..again a rookie error and a good reason to make sure you have managed speed before selecting the flaps to avoid an over speed.

2. ATC asked for an increase in speed whilst levelled off and the pilots just wound the speed up quickly from say 220-270, again causing the engines to spool up.

I guess there could be loads of things as well like a TCAS, but I would guess at number one as it is the easiest to do and if your not quick to re select the speed it does cause the engines to spool up quite quickly.

Hope this helps
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Old 02-20-2014, 07:00 AM   #5542
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

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I fly the 320
Another pilot! This is great. Maybe we could find something you guys disagree on and have an argument. Call each other names and disparage your companies, that kind of stuff. This could be big. A TV show isn't far away. Pilot Wars!
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Old 02-20-2014, 07:03 AM   #5543
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Great thread
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Old 02-20-2014, 08:14 AM   #5544
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

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Originally Posted by Bluffazoid View Post
I fly the 320 and it it could be a couple of things.

1. The pilots forgot to activate the approach phase whilst in a pilot selected speed, and when they reverted to, the managed speed which is computed by the FMGC and one of its uses is for the speeds to extend the flaps, the speed target would increase upto 250kts from say a selected 200, causing the engines to spool up..again a rookie error and a good reason to make sure you have managed speed before selecting the flaps to avoid an over speed.

2. ATC asked for an increase in speed whilst levelled off and the pilots just wound the speed up quickly from say 220-270, again causing the engines to spool up.

I guess there could be loads of things as well like a TCAS, but I would guess at number one as it is the easiest to do and if your not quick to re select the speed it does cause the engines to spool up quite quickly.

Hope this helps
Thanks Bluffazoid!


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Another pilot! This is great. Maybe we could find something you guys disagree on and have an argument. Call each other names and disparage your companies, that kind of stuff. This could be big. A TV show isn't far away. Pilot Wars!
That really made me laugh! You're a genius Didace.

We could have lines like: "Really? You're going to use Vertical Speed in this situation? You disgust me!"
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Old 02-20-2014, 08:35 AM   #5545
 
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

Glad a 320 pilot joined the conversation.

I fly quite a bit for work so is it my imagination or are Airbus aircraft not very well manufactured? It seems that 80% of the Airbus flights I am on seem to have "bugs" or little deficiencies.

For example, flickering lights, seats that don't lock in the upright position, AC or ventilation problems, if they have video screens, problems with those. Things just always seem to be not quite right. A far greater incidence than Boeing.
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Old 02-20-2014, 12:38 PM   #5546
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

Thank you both, so next time I fly and this happens I will stand up and start screaming "activate the f. approach and set your speed right" while waving my hands and rolling my eyes.
But seriously some good info so this is something similar to setting your cruise control to 80mph in a school zone while playing with your radio kind of a thing...
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Old 02-22-2014, 06:17 AM   #5547
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Originally Posted by Professionalpoker View Post
Glad a 320 pilot joined the conversation.

I fly quite a bit for work so is it my imagination or are Airbus aircraft not very well manufactured? It seems that 80% of the Airbus flights I am on seem to have "bugs" or little deficiencies.

For example, flickering lights, seats that don't lock in the upright position, AC or ventilation problems, if they have video screens, problems with those. Things just always seem to be not quite right. A far greater incidence than Boeing.
Haha I am not going to start a Boeing vs airbus debate I am sure that has been done to death in this thread, and if not it has been all over the internet.

What I can say is in just over 3 years on the type i only take a delay due to a tech problem maybe twice a year, so perhaps a sample size thing? Not an expert on IFE as we don't have that on ours, nor reclining seats (euro lo-cost airline) so can't comment on that.

On a side not I have heard from the engineers that work a multitude of types that AC problems are quite common on all types but I have no figures for that!
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Old 02-22-2014, 06:35 AM   #5548
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

Hey bluffazoid, since you said you were working for a euro low-cost airline - how are the working conditions in airlines such as yours? You know how every now and then there are newspieces about Ryanair and how they push the pilots to the limit, only tank the minimum amount of fuel, etcetc, do you have any experiences like this or anything you've heard from collegues?
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Old 02-22-2014, 08:40 AM   #5549
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

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Another pilot! This is great. Maybe we could find something you guys disagree on and have an argument. Call each other names and disparage your companies, that kind of stuff. This could be big. A TV show isn't far away. Pilot Wars!
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Haha I am not going to start a Boeing vs airbus debate
We're not getting on TV with a defeatist attitude like that.
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Old 02-22-2014, 09:59 AM   #5550
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Re: Ask me about being an airline pilot or flying in general

Freshly back from recurrent training. It's kind of like a visit to the dentist: no one really wants to go, but you know that there is a benefit in the process. And you have that "clean" feeling when you leave.

My classroom for the last two days...

767 Sim with bridge down (walkway for entry)




Bridge up, ready for action (different angle)



Here's some of the things I did during these sessions:

• V1 engine failure at Bogota (high altitude airport with mountains in the vicinity; adherence to special procedures is essential)

• Single engine approach and go-around

• Autoland (done mainly to reset my autoland currency so I can fly them on the line)

• Loss of pressurization over critical terrain (i.e. high elevation). This requires special procedures to get down quickly and also exit the area of high terrain expeditiously.

• Flap failure on takeoff

• Familiarization with new Atlanta arrival procedures

• Windshear recovery on takeoff and on landing

• Recovery from stall in cruise

• Recovery from CFIT (controlled flight into terrain scenario)

• Failure of airspeed indicator (inspired by Air France accident)

• TCAS event (resolution advisory, requiring escape maneuver)

• RNAV/RNP approach, including a missed approach

Day 2 included an LOE (line oriented evaluation), which is a flight training scenario intended to present a real life situation. This is conducted as if we are flying a real flight, i.e. we get a flight plan (JFK-BOS) and we start at the gate. All you know for sure is that the flight will not go perfectly smoothly. The problem(s) you encounter are selected randomly from a set available for these sessions. I actually drew a pretty easy one. We had a medical emergency en route and the point of the LOE was to observe crew coordination and decision making. It was uneventful.

At the end of yesterday's session we still had a little time available in the sim, so the instructor asked if there was anything else I'd like to try. I asked to try a deadstick landing of the 767. He set me up in cruise flight at 35000' about 90 miles from SFO and we killed both engines there. We didn't attempt a re-light (as we would in real life), but we did start the APU so that we would have electrical power.

At this point, I simply turned directly to SFO and set myself up in a glide at about 230 kts. It became apparent after just a couple of minutes that we would have no problem making it to the airport. In fact, the descent itself was not an issue at all...borderline boring in fact. I just kept monitoring the descent progress. We put SFO in our fix page and put rings on the display at 50, 20, 10 and 5 miles. This was just for situational awareness and to help monitor the altitude vs distance to go.

The crucial part of this exercise was determining when to get the airplane dirty (lowering flaps and gear) and start slowing. It's an energy management puzzle and you get one chance at this so you don't want to find yourself too low.

I started slowing at 10 miles, getting some flaps out. I lowered the gear as we approached the 5 mile ring. We were well above glide path, which is good. Once we were dirty and started slowing to our target approach speed (154 kts in this case), it was a visual maneuver. Just like a private pilot, I'm now watching the runway sight picture and determining if we're on a good path for our point of intended landing. I didn't actually get down to that speed until just over the runway and I was perfectly willing to accept a fast landing (long runway, good brakes). The main goal is get the plane on the ground and be able to walk away from it.

The descent rate was greater than normal and we actually got the "DESCENT RATE" aural warning at one point, which was expected. It was classic energy management at this point: trade speed to arrest descent rate and try to do that so we touch down with adequate runway remaining.

My attention was completely outside and I touched down about 1500-2000' down the runway. It turned out to be the best landing I made in the sim in the two days I was there.

This was a very interesting exercise. It gave me great confidence in the plane to see how well it glided.

Last edited by W0X0F; 02-22-2014 at 10:07 AM.
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