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Old 10-09-2014, 08:08 PM   #76
piranha
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schneids View Post
What sort of game-flow differences, if any, have you noticed from other regs in the way how they play pre and/or postflop compared to 2-4 years ago?
Good question, the game has really evolved over that time span, particularly from BF to about a year ago. I don't think too much has changed in the last year or so though.

The two biggest differences in preflop play I've seen are 3-betting ranges and defending ranges. Nearly all the regulars have much wider 3-betting and defending ranges in comparison to 2-3 years ago. Back then you'd still see regulars that were folding their BB to steal 40% and 3-bet %'s around 10-12%. Now it's rare to see FBB to steal %'s less than 35 and 3-bet %'s less than 13 or 14.

The biggest thing that jumps out to me postflop is how people handle their draws. 2-3 years ago and really anytime before that, the conventional wisdom was to always play your draws aggressively and try to force players out of the pot or pick up pots uncontested. Nowadays there's a lot more passive play with draws.

I think this relates to the overall level of hand reading improving. People are better recognizing those situations where their hand is going to look exactly like what it is to their opponents and therefore it's unlikely they'll win the pot without a showdown.

An example of this could be defending JT vs an UTG raise. Let's say the flop is 896. In the past I don't think there was any thought from any regular aside from "I have an open-ended straight draw so I have to raise". Now the thoughts can be more along the lines of, "If I raise the flop, my hand's going to look a draw and given the strength of my opponent's range on this flop, there may be better ways to play this hand".

There are a lot of these types of situations in multiway pots as well where it's so unlikely you're going to get multiple folds given the board texture and your opponent's ranges, that raising at all costs on the flop isn't necessarily the best line.

Something I find interesting about this, is that the more passive people become with draws, the more that favors becoming more aggressive with them again. Going back to that JT example, if it gets to the point where people are never raising JT in that situation, then the UTG raiser will start laying hands down and then semi-bluffing becomes profitable again. It's a matter of push and pull like everything else but just generally people are playing draws more passively or looking for more creative ways to win pots with their draws (like turn/cr's, river c/r's, or river donks).

Something else that you see a lot more of (and I expect this trend to continue) is checking back the flop. It was pretty rare to see that 2-3 years ago and nowadays almost everyone is doing it to some degree. This is one area that I think someone could gain a pretty big edge in today's game with. I don't think anyone, myself included, has a really well developed and thought out checkback strategy.

One other overall tendency that I think has changed is that people are attacking more in wide range situations. Specifically the SB v BB, But vs BB, and CO vs. BB dynamics. It's rare to see anyone playing fit and fold in these spots anymore whereas 2-3 years ago it wasn't totally uncommon. Any by attacking, not only raising a lot of flops but floating more as well
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Old 10-09-2014, 08:16 PM   #77
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schneids View Post
What sort of game-flow differences, if any, have you noticed from other regs in the way how they play pre and/or postflop compared to 2-4 years ago?
One more really big difference I overlooked are regulars turn c-betting %'s. I think it was the norm to have a turn c-bet % around 80% 3 years ago. The average now is closer to 70%.
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:41 AM   #78
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by DesertCat View Post
Mr. Pirahha,

I don't have any intelligent questions to ask, so I'll just say it was great sitting with you at the San Jose donkfest meetup last year. I'm hoping DFS goes well for you and that you are happy and better rested, I remember how you still looked exhausted from your SNE sprint.

thanks for the well,
Randy

PS: based on my experience, you are way better than Cosi. I have at least 30 live hands vs. him and he has been powerless to stop me from getting there, while you seemed to carry the force with you in SJ. Don't quit playing live holdem, at least occasionally, nothing was more hilarious than playing 40 with Cosi and 6 donks who thought he was the live one. I still remember one saying "He called but couldn't even beat King high!"

This reminds me
I played with a Bay Area guy this summer at bellagio and he talked about how great it was playing with you and how nice you were during the meet up.
Think it was Zeke or MApoker, but forget their name. They had mentioned having a piece of one of the Minnesota guys in the 10k HORSE.

/derail
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Old 10-10-2014, 02:06 AM   #79
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Thanks for taking time to do this and I wish you all the best in your future endeavours.

What was your job prior to poker?

Did you plan on playing poker for decades?

Did you ever take a stab at nosebleeds back when durrr, benyamine, schneids played?

You wrote #30 going for SNE and being abroad at times made you unhappy. In retrospect, do you feel it was a mistake moving abroad to play online?
Thanks PlsFold. And best of luck to you at the poker tables.

I worked two jobs for the seven years leading up to playing poker. The first was managing a pool room outside of Boston. And the other was being an internal customer support/tech manager for a team of people at a major bank - basically our team solved any internal problems that would come up at the bank, banking or technical.

Really couldn't get two jobs that were further away from each other. My job at the pool room involved dealing with a pretty seedy side of the world whereas the bank was on the opposite end of the spectrum. That said there's plenty of crooks in both worlds, they're just disguised better at the banks.

I think I was making $35K a year at the bank and was one of the higher paid employees in my department of 200+ people. At the pool room, I was making $8/HR.

When I started playing poker I was primarily playing SNG's and worked my way up the $200's on Party Poker. I used to bring my laptop to the bank and play a SNG on my lunch break. I'd also sneak a few in during the day when the managers were off. It didn't take too long for me to realize I was going to be able to make more money playing poker than working the two jobs.

Initially I did think I was going to play poker for a long time, possibly the rest of my life. I've gambled for as long as I can remember and it's all I've ever loved to do. To give you an idea, I had engaged in just about every imaginable form of gambling besides the stock market by age 16. When I went to college, I had a blackjack shoe in my room where I'd deal out shoes for endless hours and record the results of my play. Even back then, I used to read every gambling book I could get my hands on. So I always envisioned I'd be gambling for a living because it's truly what I love but I wasn't sure what form it would take. Poker was the first form that I could make a steady, reliable income from.

I never took any shots in the nosebleed games and overall I think I've been very conservative in terms of moving up in limits. When I was twenty-two years old I won 450 thousand dollars playing blackjack at Foxwoods from a single hundred dollar chip. I proceeded to lose back nearly all that money over the next few months including one session where I lost 370K in less than 8 hours playing 18K/Hand. I spent the next six years of my life dead broke and kicking myself over the whole blackjack experience. So when I started poker, I guess you could say I was scarred. I had my mind made up that I was never going to be reckless with money, I was going to treat it like a job, and make sure I was never playing over my head. I think I took this to the other extreme of being too conservative but I'm still happy with how things turned out considering the alternative.

RE: Moving Abroad

I didn't really have a choice aside from doing the live poker/Bovada thing. I think I'd be a lot more miserable playing live poker/Bovada than I was travelling. Honestly I didn't have much choice with the amount of money I had in relation to the expenses I had. I needed to maintain a similar level of income to pre BF and I'm not sure that would of been possible playing live poker/Bovada.
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Old 10-10-2014, 02:14 AM   #80
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Note: I have a really busy next 3-4 days coming up so I don't know how many questions I'll be able to get to. But feel free to keep asking and though it may take me a while, I'll eventually get to every one.
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Old 10-10-2014, 02:18 AM   #81
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Hi Tpirahna.

Thanks alot for doing this. You have always been an idol of mine and I followed your blog for a few years now. I hope you all the best for the Future!

I would have a few questions, I hope you can help me with them ( I hope that this are not too many and you feel ok to answer them):
  1. How much Equity do you think we should have to 3bet preflop in position and also how does this change if we are oop ( like in the SB vs BU openraise). Is there a difference if you are BB vs SB or do you handle it the same way as if it would be BU and CO except for different ranges?
  2. This question might already be answered with the answer to the first question, but in case it's not: What do you think about always calling the BB vs an openraise from the SB?
  3. What do you think about openlimping in the SB as a default to avoid bloating the pot oop? Especially since a lot of players will be 3betting pretty wide in the BB vs SB.
  4. How much Equity do you think should be enough to peel the Flop oop? Assuming that our Opponent Cbets the Turn "normaly" so around 65 - 75% the time?
  5. in Contrast how much wider do you think can the peeling range in position be? Maybe even as low as the pot odds?
  6. Do you have a pre- and or postgame routine?

As before: Thanks alot for this possibility and all the Best!

Last edited by Buxbaum; 10-10-2014 at 02:27 AM.
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Old 10-10-2014, 03:58 PM   #82
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Awesome questions. Similar to mine but articulated better. Hope he answers!
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Old 10-10-2014, 06:35 PM   #83
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Currency based question:
I withdraw in GBP. I play in USD and therefore win USD. What conversion strategy should i use to maximise/minimise loss/gain during trading currency for withdrawal. I believe the transfer rate varies from 0.6-0.64 depending in the currency markets. and i tend to store maximum 40 buyins in my account for any level. What was your strategy/rules?
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Old 10-10-2014, 07:31 PM   #84
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

What were your screen names on AP and UB?
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Old 10-11-2014, 01:03 AM   #85
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by AlanBostick View Post
D.E.R.B. - Genius ahead of his time, or luckbox who ran hot enough for selection bias to make us notice him?
Hey AB,

I actually know next to nothing about DERB. I've heard of his legend from the forums but aside from that I really know nothing. I'd have to see results and sample size to be able to make any kind of guess at it.
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Old 10-11-2014, 01:35 AM   #86
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by GTLbaby View Post
Hey TP, played a few hands with ya at 30/60+ always thought you were decent. Best wishes regarding your future. My question just involves what BR do you personally think is necessary to be playing these stakes 4 tabling to 6 tabling at most? I talked to Stick about it briefly but he didn't understand me it appears. Best luck again TP. Cheers
-GTLbabyyy
Thanks GTL.

The bankroll needed to play mid/high stakes is going to be heavily dependent on your win rate as well as your Stars status (SN or SNE). I believe the biggest downswing I experienced in my career was around 800 BB's but I was also earning ~70% in rakeback in the form of bonuses during my downswings so they were never quite that bad.

I think the general rule of thumb to have 1000 BB's is probably safe for any winning player that's SN or SNE. I suppose for someone that's barely a winner, like a .1 BB/100 player, they could possibly need more.

One mistake I made throughout my career was to assume I always needed 1000 BB's of the highest limit I was playing. Given how infrequently the high limit games run in comparison to lower limits, this was way too cautious. If you look at your HEM, you should be able to figure out your average stake by multiplying the number of hands you play at each stake by the stake (in Big Bets) and then dividing by the total number of hands.

For example, let's say I play 100 hands of 30/60, 200 hands of 15/30, and 500 hands of 10/20. I'd multiply 100*60 + 200*30 + 500*20 = 22000. Divide that number by 100+200+500 (the total # of hands) or 800 and you get 27.5. So my average stake would be roughly $14/$28.

So 1000 BB's would mean I'd need 28K. If I was SN or SNE I'd lower that number further to 25K or possibly even 20K. One thing to always keep in mind is that you have the ability to drop down in stakes. Even though that's not ideal for a winning player, it's not like you're forced to continue playing your highest stakes when a huge downswing hits.

But again it all really depends on your level of skill. Obviously a player that's slightly above break-even is going to have more severe swings than a .5 BB/100 winner.

It never really was an exact science for me and I guess part of the reason was that up until the last few years I knew I was being way too cautious.
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Old 10-11-2014, 06:10 AM   #87
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Can you go more into detail on your black jack run? Running 1 black chip to 450k.. Do you still play blackjack or any other Pitt games? How did u ever get over the 350k loss, does it still haunt you? Did that loss push you harder to succeed in poker?
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Old 10-11-2014, 12:37 PM   #88
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by dark_horse View Post
Can you give us your common stats plus winrates from the SB and BB, for the past 500k hands or so?

What is your 3bet % from the BB vs a SB open? Does it depend greatly on opponent?
How do you handle your SB play (pre and post) vs a BB who 3bets SB steals extremely wide?
Are you ever the last aggressor out of position heads up for more than one raise (i.e. no cap vs 3bet, call only in BB)?

Thanks for this well. Been reading your blog for awhile. GL in your future pursuits.
Thanks DH.

The only common stat I know off the top of my head for SB v BB is that I open 78% of my hands on average. There are some situations I may open 100% and some situations I may open 70% (mainly a very good BB).

My HEM actually stopped working properly about a year ago (I still use HEM 1.14) so I actually can't filter for some things including the SB v BB dynamic. I tried reinstalling and even using on a different computer and I'm having the same issue so not sure what's going on but I don't need it at this point.

From the BB, I 3-bet roughly 24% of my hands against a typical SB. This number isn't too important though. There are a lot of possible strategies in that dynamic that have merit. One of which is never 3-betting preflop and attacking a lot of flops, turns, and rivers.

There's no glaring strategic reason that says you have to 3-bet preflop with your stronger hands. You can just as easily take all those stronger hands and raise a lot of flops, turns, and rivers. One benefit to this is you've now seen 60%-100% of the board and can make a more informed decision in position. Another benefit is that it keeps your range as wide as possible postflop which makes it harder for your opponents to make good decisions.

I think flatting your whole range preflop requires a more complex postflop strategy. Specifically, you need to have proper bluffing frequencies on all the different board textures. What happens to some people that flat their whole range is that they're not bluffing enough. But for those that do take the time to work out those bluffing frequencies, it can be just as profitable, if not more profitable, than 3-betting preflop.

In terms of combating an aggressive BB that's 3-betting the SB liberally, there are a number of strategies. The most common strategy is to cap a wider range. I think this is the simplest strategy but not necessarily the best. People that are 3-betting 40-50% of their hands preflop understand that they're very aggressive and they expect people to fight back by capping. So I think this is the strategy they're best suited to deal with and the one they're most familiar with.

Another strategy that I think puts aggressive BB's in a tougher spot is to c/r a lot of flops. Let's say you c/r 30% of flops against a typical BB, maybe you increase that to 40 or 50% against an aggressive 3-bettor.

Another possibly strategy is to start floating more with the intention of c/r more turns. Or even double-floating and leading rivers depending on how the board plays out.

My preference is to take a combination of the last two strategies and attack more flops along with floating more flops and turns. Essentially we just want to make sure we're making our opponent's lives miserable by fighting back in various ways. The less transparent we are about fighting back and the more we can put our opponent in difficult situations, the better.

To answer your last question, I prefer flatting for the most part as opposed to capping as I mentioned above. One big exception to this is against a maniac or just anyone that I expect is going to be spewy on later streets. Against these players it's best to get as many bets in as possible preflop with the expectation that we'll often get multiple bets in postflop with our best hands.
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Old 10-11-2014, 04:50 PM   #89
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Great stuff. Thanks, Tony!

My strategy vs the wide BB 3bettors is indeed to attack lots of flops or turns, but because yes they know that they'll be played back at a fair amount, they will often not give that flop c/r much respect and keep going in various ways to continue to make life hard, such as raising the turn, or simply 3betting the flop. Vs guys who seem to just "have my number" all day, I'll simply play tighter from the SB. Hands like K4 give me the most trouble.

Also, sick BJ story. I'm sure it has fueled your success.
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Old 10-12-2014, 09:01 AM   #90
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Hello, TPirahna,
thanks for this format,
I also have some questions:
- while playing, u used to take regular breaks. What did u do during those breaks? How often did u take them? How long did they last?
- before acting, u always took equal time to think in order not to give time tells. How did u realize it was time to act? Was it timebank? Or stopwatch?
The questions might look a bit strange, but I'm really curious to learn the answers.
Thanks again.
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Old 10-12-2014, 11:25 AM   #91
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Tony,

Could you explain your opinion on seat selection? I see almost all regs do pay little or no attention to it. Conventional wisdom has it that the best seat is to left of the worst player at the table but i see almost alls reg including those who are considered the top players consistently play in any seat.

How much of difference does the seat really make? Is there any quantifyable evidence that having postition on the fish but beeing oop vs regs is a big edge?
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:10 PM   #92
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

Great well. I've asked this question before to others and have never received a good response:

Assuming the pot ends up HU preflop with players of similar caliber, what % of the preflop equity do you think is realized by the in-position player vs. the out-of-position player?

Thank you in advance.
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Old 10-12-2014, 10:10 PM   #93
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by MyLady17 View Post
Here are my questions. It woul be very kind of you, if you answered them:

a) I am pretty sure you have a checkbehind Flop Range. Only HU and 4handed+ or 3handed aswell?

b) do you have a checkbehind Flop rT Range or even xbF cT rR Range or do they only consist of improvaments (for example A2 on a JT7 A Board?)

c) My idea of a balanced xbF Range ist to fold 20%, call 60% and raise 20% on the turn. What was your gameplan? Did you always stick to your plan or did it depend on your Villains?

d) How would you describe your game? GTO or exploitive? I guess it is a mixture. what's the Mix?

e) what would be your first advice to an advanced pokerplayer, let's say someone who plays 2/4 and who wants to reach T/20+? e.g. valuebet thinner, bluff less, be more polarised/merged etc.

many thanks and good Luck to you. Enjoy your life and your new challenges!
Hi MyLady,

a) Checking back is more situation and board texture dependent so it can be done in any game with any number of players.

b) I'm not exactly sure what you're asking here

c) I don't think you can really come up with set %'s that determine your actions on streets. Everything is dependent on the board texture, the situation, your hand, your opponent, etc. etc. So it's not as simplistic as just standardizing your actions for each street (though I often wished it was).

d) I talked a little about this in another response but my style is primarily exploitive. The better the opponent I'm facing, then the more balanced I'll try to be. I'd even take it a step further to say it's opponent and situation dependent. In other words if it's a very uncommon situation, then generally I don't worry about being balanced, regardless of my opponent's skill level. But the more common the situation and the better the player, then the more important it becomes.

An example of this would be playing BvB against a good player. Because the situation is so common and our opponents are so experienced with it, if we're unbalanced, the likelihood of us getting exploited goes way up. And not to say you need to be perfectly balanced (if that's even possible) but you don't want any glaring tendencies. In other words, it's still ok to try to exploit your opponent at the risk of of leaving yourself open for exploitation - that's essentially what poker's all about to me.

e) My advice would be to expend as much energy as possible on learning to hand read. I gave some advice on how to do this in a previous response. Hand reading is at the heart of every decision and if you're able to accurately hand read, everything else falls into place. You don't need to be concerned with general tendencies at that point because everything's specific to your opponent's range.
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Old 10-12-2014, 10:51 PM   #94
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by cottonseed1 View Post
While you touched on this in another post, outside of money management what were your biggest mistakes in your poker career? If you could go back in time and give yourself advice 10 years ago what would it be (does not necessarily have to be poker related)?

If DFS does not work out, would you enter the work force or would you go back to poker? Did you ever consider transitioning into something non-gambling related?

I have always enjoyed reading your blog. Hopefully, you will continue to post occasional updates. Thank you for taking the time to make a well!
Hey Kyle,

Thanks, I remember you telling me you read my blog. For some reason I'm always humbled and surprised to hear nosebleed players were reading it.

I think the single biggest mistake I made was not trying to branch out to other games early in my career. I started out playing SNG's, moved to LHE and MTTs maybe a year or two after, but then never put a lot of effort into learning other games.

It wasn't until a few years ago where it looked like LHE was on it's way out (and still may be), that I really had a sense of urgency to try to learn something else. And by that time I was so far behind the curve in terms of knowledge and skill, that it would of required a lot of my time. I think if I had learned the other games like PLO when they first became popular, there wouldn't of been that huge skill gap to overcome and it would of been a lot easier.

If I could go back in time and tell myself something, it would probably be to have more confidence in my ability. I was always very slow to move up in limits and consistently overestimated the skill level difference between them. I always assumed the next limit up would be much more difficult than the limit I was playing but the reality was that there were only small differences in skill between the majority of the limits.

This really hindered my money-making ability. It took me six years to move from 5/10 to 50/100 and I think I was probably ready for it three years earlier than that. At the very least, I wouldn't have been a big loser and it likely wouldn't have taken me too long to become a winner.

If DFS doesn't work out, I'll very likely be going back into online poker (it pains me to type that). I can't see myself doing anything non-gambling related unless it pays really well. I don't have any objections to a different job (I can always gamble on the side) but I think it'd be very difficult to find anything that pays on the same level. If I get to the point where I'm comfortable with money and don't have the need for a steady significant income, then I'd definitely give consideration to doing something else that's less work-intensive and stressful.
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Old 10-13-2014, 12:12 AM   #95
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by Jon_locke View Post
I've also been taking fantasy sports pretty seriously this year. One spot I have is a weekly heads up draft, standard scoring, non ppr 1 QB, 2 RB/2 WR/TE/Flex/K/def.

What would you consider the best strategy for such a draft? Obviously jts opponent dependent, but at first we thought we should be drafting players with the highest gap in replacement players (basically jimmy grahm first) but quickly changed directions before our first draft (almost always Murray first)
Hmm, I'm only playing salary cap structures, where everyone can draft the same players, and have no experience with drafting or the strategy behind it. If it's a weekly draft though, I'd think it would vary from week to week depending on the matchups the different players have. But really I'm clueless as to all the strategy behind drafting.
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Old 10-13-2014, 12:53 PM   #96
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Maybe you've explained this in your blog in the past, but was moving from country to country something you wanted to do or something you had to do?

Along those lines, do you see yourself staying in the SF Bay Area or moving around (for pleasure / fun or to minimize living costs, etc.)?
This was a choice. Both my wife and I enjoy travelling so it seemed like a good/fun idea to explore a lot of places. The more travelling I did though, the more I wanted to stay in one place. There were a lot of unknowns along with a lot of expenses every time we moved.

One of the big unknowns was internet. Some places it wasn't a problem and other places it was a nightmare. The last place we stayed in Jaco, Costa Rica had constant internet problems. We had a new router installed, new internet installed, bought a wireless card, etc. etc. and still had problems until the day I left. The single biggest expense I had over the 3 years travelling was money lost from internet disconnections. I don't know the exact amount it cost but it was well into the tens of thousands of dollars.

It was to the point where I didn't care how much the place costed to rent, I just wanted to be sure the internet worked. It could be 6K a month to rent and it'd be cheaper than a place that was 2K with the internet constantly cutting out. The problem was that everyone would always say, "Oh yeah our internet is fine", not reallly understanding that I wasn't looking to check my email once in a while and that I needed super reliable internet.

At this point I think we'll be staying in the Bay area. I'm planning on selling my house soon but don't anticipate I'll be moving too far. The living costs here are extremely high but my wife's family lives out here and she grew up here so it's unlikely we'll leave even though it'd save us a lot of money.
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Old 10-13-2014, 02:12 PM   #97
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

For someone not into sports at all, assuming presence of high learning abilities and willingness to do hard work:

1- How would you get them started in DFS (just pointing in the right direction would suffice here)?
2- Is there a 2+2-like forum for DFS?
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Old 10-13-2014, 02:56 PM   #98
callipygian
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by piranha View Post
everyone would always say, "Oh yeah our internet is fine", not reallly understanding that I wasn't looking to check my email once in a while and that I needed super reliable internet.
Was "gambling online" something you generally disclosed to your landlords / neighbors / new friends?

Heck, is "professional gambler" something you disclose to your old friends?
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Old 10-13-2014, 04:09 PM   #99
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by callipygian View Post
Also, if you're unaware of it, the Broken Rack has moved. It's now on the other side of the Powell St. overpass in its own building.
Thanks yeah a bunch of people have told me it's really nice.

I can't wait to play pool, it's killing me not to play. I'm sort of in a limbo stage right now with DFS. There's one sport I know I'm really profitable at and it just ended - MLB. So I'm working extremely hard on the other sports but it takes a lot of time not just to learn but to know whether I'm profitable and roughly what I can expect to make.

So until I'm confident I'll have some steady income coming in from one of these other sports, pool is going to have to wait. The last thing I want to do is have to go back to playing poker so all my time is invested in DFS right now.
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Old 10-13-2014, 04:27 PM   #100
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Re: Retirement from Poker/TPirahna "Well"

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Originally Posted by bicyclekick View Post
Tommy angelo coined the term in an article here

TLDR: "In the world of reciprocality, it's not what you do that matters most, and it's not what they do. It's both. Reciprocality is any difference between you and your opponents that affects your bottom line. Reciprocality says that when you and your opponents would do the same thing in a given situation, no money moves, and when you do something different, it does."
So the situations that have the most reciprocality or the most difference between my play and my opponent's play would probably be:

-PreFlop Play
-Postflop play, more specifically turn/river play in position

I probably sound like a broken record at this point but I see a lot of variation in preflop play among regulars. My preflop play is very much an exact science. I know what I can open profitably, 3-bet profitably, and defend profitably in every conceivable 6-max situation under typical game conditions. I've spent dozens, probably hundreds of hours, researching this. I actually have a text document with every situation listed and my default ranges listed for each. I'd go back and revisit this a few times a year and make adjustments. So from there it's just a matter of adjusting borderline hands based on my opponents in whatever game I'm playing.

The specific areas of preflop play that vary the most from mine are probably defending ranges against EP-CO. I see quite a bit of variation here and a wide range of defending hands across regulars. There's variation in some other areas but not as much.

My turn/river play in position varies greatly from almost everyone. I don't want to get into too many specifics but just generally I prefer to defer most of my range to the river, whether it be value or bluffing hands. There are some drawbacks to this but a number of benefits as well. That said, I don't think I'm gaining a huge edge with this strategy but I do think it provides me with some edge.

There are a lot of other smaller areas of course but they really differ so much from opponent to opponent that I don't think I could list one general thing. Maybe checking back I guess. I do think I check back flops more than most people.
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